New Publication –An Introduction to Food Fraud, Including Translation and Interpretation to Russian, Korean, and Chinese Languages

We are pleased to announce our most recent publication  – in case you missed it in your copy – in Food Chemistry Journal. If you follow our blog you know that we have been collaborating with countries all-around the world, and especially with China, Korea, and Russia. During those trips we have been introducing Food …

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Badges?

So pardon me for rambling on, but the title of last week’s blog was in fact derived from a blues song by Mississippi Joe Callicott that goes under several names including “Leaving Town Blues” and “Plow Hand Blues.” There are pretty similar lines in blues sung by Big Bill Broonzey and Leadbelly, though in those …

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Sufficient biological replication is essential for differential expression analysis of RNA-seq

I just took part in a twitter discussion about the trade-offs between sequencing depth and number of independent biological replicate (per treatment group) for differential gene expression analysis. While there are applications of RNA-seq where  sequencing deeply (more than say 50 million reads for a given sample) can be important for discovery. However, most researchers …

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Twins reared apart

For those interested in studies of identical twins reared apart, see IQ Similarity of Twins Reared Apart: findings and responses to critics, Bouchard (1997). A question sometimes raised by critics concerns the extent to which twins reared apart actually experienced different environments. Norms of reaction, GxE interactions, and other (conceptually trivial but potentially obfuscatory) topics …

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Network Detroit

Today, I attended the dh conference, Network Detroit, and presented on the Public Philosophy Journal (http://publicphilosophyjournal.org/), in a talk entitled, “Reimagining Scholarly Publishing and the Public Philosophy Journal.”  It is a wonderful regional conference that attracts many DHers from the midwest and beyond.  The conference is in its second year, held at Lawrence Tech, and wonderfully …

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The Human Trial of Perseverance

Perseverance isn’t flashy. It isn’t really highlight material. Illustrations of perseverance don’t necessarily make for exciting television. So I don’t blame you if you didn’t hear about the Guilder Rodriguez story. Who is Guilder, you ask? Why, he’s the 31 year-old utility infielder who plays Major League Baseball for the Texas Rangers. Only thing is…Guilder …

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Implementing Discovery

This post is the first (of two) about my suggestions for how to implement “open discovery” for answering scientific questions, but in a way that does not completely alienate current professional scientists. In particular because of the current system of how “credit” for answering questions translates to prestige which directly translates to tangible materialistic considerations …

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Update: Mark Twain, Eugene Field, and a Skeptical Odyssey in the Stacks

Back in March, I shared something we had recently discovered in the Special Collections vault: an 1835 edition of Cruikshank at Home, inscribed by noted authors Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) and Eugene Field.  We were excited to find the autographs of these two 19th century literary giants, especially because no mention of the inscriptions was made in our library …

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Dangerous Love

The newest (October 2014) issue of The Sun arrived late last week in my mailbox (October issue is not available online as of the time I write this. As of this morning I’ve read most all of it. Since resubscribing after many years of absence I have found it to be ‘soul building’ food. The …

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Blues Ate My Bread

So picking up right where we left off last week, and switching directions 180° there are reasons why I decided to do another month of food songs this year. I often sit in front of my computer on Sunday mornings listening to songs from my music collection on i-Tunes. I’ve had to struggle with the …

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Modeling learning: take two

I was thinking last week about modeling learning in terms of an article that argued that different “models” (behavioral, cognitive, social) help to explain different aspects of learning. That motivated me to model what I think learning is — here’s my initial result with an explanation below: Individuals have some motivation for participating in social practices. Social practices as …

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Developer’s Dilemma

My first book, Developer’s Dilemma will be hitting Amazon officially in November, though it may be available sooner. The official book blurb: Rank-and-file game developers bring videogames from concept to product, and yet their work is almost invisible, hidden behind the famous names of publishers, executives, or console manufacturers. In this book, Casey O’Donnell examines the creative collaborative practice …

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Humanities Data

Yesterday, I talked with a group of folks in the History Department about this thing we’ve been kicking around the library called “Humanities Data”. Thanks to Dean Rehberger for the invite, and thanks also to Brandon Locke for hosting us in the newly launched LEADR lab. The presentation itself was in part a product of some writing Devin Higgins and I have been …

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Excellent Sheep and Chinese Americans

Two recent podcasts I recommend. I disagree with Deresiewicz on many points (see my comments on Steve Pinker’s response here and here), but the discussion is worth a listen. Do the Best Colleges Produce the Worst Students? As schools shift focus from the humanities to “practical” subjects like economics and computer science, students are losing the ability to think …

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The Letter…

I wrote a few weeks back about my disgust that Scientific American would post articles which clearly do not value diversity. Given that Nature has also been called on the carpet for this, I find it refreshing and ironic that the Nature Publishing Group (parent to both of these publications) would now sponsor a diversity week this week. Whatever …

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Stand – 7.11.2014

I had gotten off the plane a few minutes before from a couple long flights back to Michigan from the Great White North up in Alaska. Of course we had been packed into the plane, which really isn’t too bad on a regular shorter flight, but the lack of leg room at my height adds …

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Robert Frost writes a paper

First it was Lewis Carroll and Jabberwocky and now it is Robert Frost and his poem Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening that receives the EPET treatment. Here is poem #2 in our series of famous poems rewritten from a graduate school perspective. Thanks to Diana Campbell for following up a brief conversation at a party with a great first draft. Danah Henriksen and I jumped in …

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