The sound version of a Google (old) reCAPTCHA

Written by: Ranti Junus

Primary Source: blog.rantijunus.net

Last month, Google announced the new no-captcha reCAPTCHA that is supposedly more accurate and better at preventing spams. We’ll see how this goes.

In the mean time, plenty of websites that employ Google’s reCAPTCHA still use the old version like this:

Google old recaptcha

The problem with this reCAPTCHA is that it fundamentally doesn’t work with screen readers (among other things, like forcing you crossed your eyes trying to figure out each character in the string.) Some people pointed out that reCAPTCHA offers the sound version (see that little red speaker?) that should mitigate the problem.

Here’s the link to sound version of a Google reCAPTCHA: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/9074989/google-recaptcha-audio.mp3

This example was taken from the PubMed website and happened to be set as a string of numbers.

Enjoy!

p.s. what is this a about PubMed using inaccessible reCAPTCHA? There are other ways to employ non-captcha security techniques without using that kind solution. :-/

p.p.s. In case you’re curious, I could not decipher two out of the eleven (if I counted it correctly) numbers said in that recording.

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Ranti Junus
Ranti Junus is Systems Librarian for Electronic Resources, supporting the design and access organization of library materials as well as support in technical and access issues related to electronic services and resources including purchased databases, the online catalog, and other digital resources. She is also responsible for assessing the library web presence and electronic resources for accessibility issues, serves as library liaison for MSU Museum Studies program, and a subject librarian for the Library & Information Science collections. She is interested in usability & accessibility (especially for persons with disabilities), issues in technology & society, open source system, digital assets management, linked data & semantic web, and digital humanities. In her spare time, she listens to prog-rock, blues, jazz, and classic.