Flattening and repairing a map

Written by: Bexx Caswell-Olson

Primary Source: Wallace Conservation Lab

Today&rsquo;s project - flattening and repairing a map using the suction platen.  The suction helps keep the map flat, while also speeding up the drying time of wet treatments.  It&rsquo;s a huge help when repairing materials that are sensitive to water (like this map, which has been colored with water colors).</p><br /><br />
<p>On the right, you can see a pile of tape that was removed from the back of the map yesterday.  </p><br /><br />
<p>I will show off the front when I am finished.</p><br /><br />
<p>-Bexx
Today’s project – flattening and repairing a map using the suction platen. The suction helps keep the map flat, while also speeding up the drying time of wet treatments. It’s a huge help when repairing materials that are sensitive to water (like this map, which has been colored with water colors).On the right, you can see a pile of tape that was removed from the back of the map yesterday.I will show off the front when I am finished.-Bexx

The following two tabs change content below.
Bexx Caswell-Olson
Before migrating to Michigan and beginning work at the MSU Libraries Wallace Conservation Lab, Bexx Caswell-Olson was employed as a bookbinder and book conservator in private practice in Iowa City, IA. Prior to running her own business, Bexx spent nearly a decade living in the Boston area where she worked in a variety of libraries and conservation labs, including those at Harvard and MIT. She is Vice President of the Guild of Book Workers, a national organization for those working in bookbinding, book conservation, and the book arts. Bexx holds a Certificate in Bookbinding from the North Bennet Street School and a Master’s of Library Science from Simmons College. In addition to her passion for bookbinding, Bexx also has an affinity for typography, bibliomysteries, seed bead weaving, and vegan baking.