Go see Ant-Man. Right now.

Written by: Emily Weigel

Primary Source: Choice Words with Choosy_Female

Ant-Man Movie PosterPhoto courtesy of imdb.com

Another Marvel blockbuster, Ant-Man, has come out this summer. With polite nods to previous Avengers and Shield storylines, this is the tale of a good guy, a super-cool shrinking suit, and a pretty amazing scientist with an affinity for ants. Not to give too much away about the plot, I’ll just leave you with this: ants help save the world from weapons of mass destruction. Yup, a tiny massed little thing saves the Earth.

This blockbuster does well to point out diversity among ant species, and the wonderfully amazing things they can do. Although some parts are definitely Hollywood-ized, the movie is great in explaining the basics of chemical communication, social living (colonies, etc.), and various adaptations to habitats. It seems to take more liberties with the physics than biology in terms of realism, but nonetheless, this is somewhat of a victory for passive science education for the public.

Education aside, it was more of a hit than its publicity would have you think. Then again, ants are tiny things with surprisingly huge impacts. Give it a shot!

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Emily Weigel
Emily Weigel (@Choosy_Female) is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Zoology and in the Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program at Michigan State University. Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Biology with a focus on interdisciplinary research from the Georgia Institute of Technology. At MSU, Weigel conducts research in the lab of Dr. Jenny Boughman and is affiliated with the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action. Her dissertation research focuses on how female choice and investment interact with male mating strategies. Additionally, Weigel’s education research asks how and why a background in genetics affects student performance in evolutionary biology. When not researching, Weigel enjoys playing soccer, surfing Netflix, and promoting STEM in the community.
Emily Weigel

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