Never Neutral: Digital Library as Argument

At this year’s DLF Forum, Chris Bourg, Cecily Walker, and Safiya Noble powerfully drove home the responsibility that the digital library community has to reflect critically as it shapes the contours of the digital environment. We must be vigilantly aware of how our decisions accrete toward a constellation of world views that simultaneously foreclose and expand conditions …

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Ghosts of Michigan Past

Halloween is a beloved day of the year, perhaps because, for some reason, we love to be scared. For many people, nothing causes more fright or fascination than ghosts, the spirits of those who have passed out of the physical world but whose lost souls remain behind. It is widely believed that ghosts remain tied …

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Challenge Accepted: Is There Archaeological Evidence of Bigfoot? (Part II)

[This article is being co-written by myself, Katy Meyers Emery, and Lisa Bright, a graduate student at MSU in the mortuary archaeology program.] Today’s article is a continuation of yesterday’s review of Bigfoot- if you haven’t already, read the first article, and then continue onto this one. To briefly review, Mitchel Townsend was featured in an article …

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Hey, Great Lakes Education Project: Got Integrity?

  The Great Lakes Education Project is a Michigan advocacy organization dedicated to advancing the charter school agenda in the state. GLEP’s official mission statement says the following: “Because a zip code shouldn’t determine the education outcomes for children, GLEP believes we must expand choice, improve quality and increase accountability.  We support Governor Snyder’s “any …

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Breakdown Lane

I’m writing on the bus from Xitou to Taipai City, and the traffic is heavy on Sunday evening. Things run in a smooth and orderly way here in Taiwan, unlike the roads around Beijing. Still and all, I see quite a few drivers zipping past on the right in the breakdown lane at about 70 …

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Grand Traverse Band Defeats Preliminary Injunction in Fifth Federal ICWA-Related Case Challenging Michigan’s ICWA Law

After initially granting a TRO based on an ex parte motion, the Western District of Michigan denied the requested preliminary injunction. The underlying complaint arguing the transfer provisions of the Michigan Indian Family Preservation Act (Michigan’s ICWA law) are unconstitutional. We are collecting documents in this case here. Tweet

GIS. For the rest of us.

  Amanda Tickner, the new map librarian, lead the workshop This week I went to a workshop at the MSU Library titled “Making a choropleth map with graduated symbols,” mainly because the only word I understood in the title was “map.” The workshop was led by Amanda Tickner, the new map librarian and knower of all …

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Fear Not!

For relentless technological advance, powered by high g researchers, venture capitalists, capital markets, and government investment in basic research, continues to deliver a cornucopia of benefits to the average joe. (Note, however, that Moore’s Law itself has stalled out recently …) Tweet

W-2s don’t lie

These numbers are derived from aggregate W-2 incomes for 158 million working Americans (see link for full table). The “raw” average wage, computed as net compensation divided by the number of wage earners, is $7,050,259,213,644.55 divided by 158,186,786, or $44,569.20. Based on data in the table below, about 67.2 percent of wage earners had net …

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The English Press and Germany: A History

The Football Scholars Forum opened its 2015-16 season on Wednesday, October 14, with a discussion of Christoph Wagner’s DeMontfort University PhD thesis entitled “Crossing The Line: The English Press and Anglo-German Football, 1954-1996.” Based on extensive archival research, “Crossing the Line” analyzes representations of Germany and Germans in English newspapers’ football coverage of key international …

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BBC interview with Robert Plomin

I recommend this BBC interview with Robert Plomin. Robert is a consummate gentleman and scholar, working in a field that inevitably attracts controversy. (Via Dominic Cummings.) Professor Robert Plomin talks to Jim Al-Khalili about what makes some people smarter than others and why he’s fed up with the genetics of intelligence being ignored. Born and …

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Regression Via Pseudoinverse

In my last post (OLS Oddities), I mentioned that OLS linear regression could be done with multicollinear data using the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse. I want to tidy up one small loose end. Specifically, let be the matrix of predictor observations (including a column of ones if a constant term is desired), let be a vector of …

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Global Impact Initiative

MSU will be hiring over 100 new professors (beyond ordinary hiring such as retirement replacements), primarily in science and technology areas that address key global challenges. Priority areas include Computation, Advanced Engineering, Genomics, Plant Sciences, Food/Environment, Precision Medicine, and Advanced Physical Sciences. MSU total funding from the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation …

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OLS Oddities

During a couple of the lectures in the Machine Learning MOOC offered by Prof. Andrew Ng of Stanford University, I came across two statements about ordinary least squares linear regression (henceforth OLS) that surprised me. Given that I taught regression for years, I was surprised that I could be surprised (meta-surprised?), but these two facts …

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Protests in Berlin

Protests in Berlin Berliners have been demonstrating today against the conditions at a registration point for refugees in their city. Tim Lüddeman (@timluedde) tweeted this composite image and a link to photos of the demonstration for non-commercial purposes with the hashtag #EsReicht (Enough!) that was the slogan of the demonstration, along with #LeGeSo, the German abbreviation …

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Data and Racists

In July 2015, PEGIDA posted a link to a GoogleMap. The map was littered with the red balloons GoogleMaps uses to denote location. Each balloon denoted the site of a home for refugees or asylum seekers. Lutz Bachmann had already encouraged his followers to camp out in front of a home for asylum seekers in …

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The Naivete of Evil

Bernd Ulrich, the main editor for Die Zeit‘s political pages, has written a beautiful essay in the October 7th edition of the paper. Despite my frequent blog posts and twitter and facebook accounts, I am an open Luddite who makes her students hand-write assignments and who has a paper subscription to Die Zeit. I also have an …

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Lachmann and Nationalism

Günther Lachmann, author of the 2005 book Tödliche Toleranz (Deadly Tolerance) and journalist for WeltOnline, published an article today on his website geolitico.de an article entitled “The Goal is a Different Germany.” In this article, Lachmann exams the refugee crisis from a perspective that exemplifies the positions of the “bourgeois” right-wing; the employed, well-educated right-wing …

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Imagine…

  Imagine that your town established a private fire or police department, funded with your tax dollars, and staffed by young inexperienced college grads with no previous experience in fire fighting or law enforcement. Imagine that these parallel organizations were given prime locations in existing facilities (built and paid for with public monies), displacing the …

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Is Reading Writing?

This is story of an un-keynote that began in discussion with @BillHD. The conceit was this: Could we create an un-keynote experience in which members of the community would be encouraged to explore the question: Is Reading Writing? This was the design: Tweets were pre-written with images of slides that presented content about my enhanced …

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Corrupt

All joking aside, I am still thinking about the revelation that agricultural scientists were sending e-mails that were supportive of the food industry point of view on several sensitive issues. In all serious I want to suggest that this is less nefarious than it has made out to be. At the same time, it’s more …

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