A comprehensive playlist for comprehensive exams

Written by: Spencer Greenhalgh

Primary Source:  Spencer Greenhalgh

I am usually listening to something while I work, but that something changes a lot from day to day and from task to task. I’ve been meaning for a while to discuss some of what keeps my ears occupied while I put my mind to work. Here’s a selection of a few of the songs that kept me focused last week as I wrote and wrote and wrote…

Ya 7weneh (Hayajan)

 

This whole album (Ya Bay) has been a favorite of mine recently. I don’t understand Arabic, so I don’t get caught up in/distracted by the words, but the music is energetic and keeps me going.

Go! (Public Service Broadcasting)

 

Public Service Broadcasting is a band that mixes historical video and audio into original music. This is part of their latest album, The Race for Space, which samples from audio related to the US and USSR space programs. I love this idea of remixing, and the music video for this track is particularly delightful.

The Jedi Steps/Finale (John Williams)

 

I loved watching the The Force Awakens when it came out, and I relied heavily on this soundtrack to keep me motivated last week. This track may be my favorite of the bunch, not only because of the first few minutes but also because of the summary of the entire soundtrack that happens after the traditional Star Wars end-of-movie music.

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Hi there! My name is Spencer Greenhalgh, and I am a student in the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology doctoral program at Michigan State University. I came to Michigan State University with a strong belief in the importance of an education grounded in the humanities. As an undergraduate, I studied French and political science and worked as a teaching assistant in both fields. After graduation, I taught French, debate, and keyboarding in a Utah private school before coming to MSU, where I plan to study how technology can be used to help students connect the humanities with their lives. I have a particular interest in the use of games and simulations to promote ethical reasoning and explore moral dilemmas, but am eager to study any technology that can help students see the relevance of studying language, culture, history, and government.

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