Independent Streams (Week of May 30th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems: With Corporate Income Tax Comes Volatility for Michigan, Economists Say (link is external). State of the State Survey Director Charley Ballard and IPPSR Director Matt Grossmann comment on the latest revenue projections and the role of Michigan corporate tax changes. Wayne County Executive kicks off …

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Forum on Sustainable Energy in Michigan

Sustainable energy is an increasingly pressing issue as the world’s finite resources deplete, and the environment continues to feel the effects of waste and pollution. In March of 2015 Governor Snyder highlighted a plan for the future of Michigan’s energy production. Included in this plan was a goal for 30-40 percent of Michigan’s energy to …

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Meat Camp!

Summer field season is upon us, and our first stop: Meat Camp! As strange as it sounds, this isn’t a summer camp of sorts, but rather the small North Carolina town where some adorable young bluebirds, and their tiny parasites, can be found. Above and to the left, you can see a nest box with …

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Java “Deep Learning” Library

If you are a Java (or Scala) (or maybe Clojure?) programmer interested in analytics, and in particular machine learning, you should take a look at Deeplearning4j (DL4J). Quoting their web site: Deeplearning4j is the first commercial-grade, open-source, distributed deep-learning library written for Java and Scala. Integrated with Hadoop and Spark, DL4J is designed to be …

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Food Waist

So picking up right where we left off last week, I’m going to loop back to the week before last when we were wringing our hands about our own pointy headedness at the 4th Annual Food Justice Workshop. Galen Martin was one of the pointy-headed academics who showed up all the way from Eugene, Oregon …

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For What It’s Worth

There is lots going on in the world of sports. There must be, as our local daily newspaper devotes more space to covering it than any other subject, seven days a week. Some of the most watched television are sports events. And it doesn’t take a genius to recognize that there is big money to …

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Interview with Soren Anderson on Energy Policy

IPPSR Policy Fellow Fabiola Yanez interviewed IPPSR Forum speaker and Faculty Affiliate Soren Anderson, an economics professor and expert on energy and environmental economics. Fabiola Yanez: At the IPPSR forum, you focused a lot on the Clean Power Plan, the options for cutting emissions include investing in renewable energy, energy efficiency, natural gas, nuclear power and …

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Theory, Money, and Learning

After 25+ years in theoretical physics research, the pattern has become familiar to me. Talented postdoc has difficulty finding a permanent position (professorship), and ends up leaving the field for finance or Silicon Valley. The final phase of the physics career entails study of entirely new subjects, such as finance theory or machine learning, and developing …

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Cuteness against PEGIDA

There was a brilliant moment in one of the presidential debates between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama where Mr. Romney was trying to lambast President Obama for being out of touch with the needs of the American military. Mitt Romney had made an impressive showing in the first debate, and Obama seemed to need a …

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EPA publishes Revised Interpretation of Clean Water Act TAS Provision

On May 16, the EPA published a final revised interpretation of the Clean Water Act’s TAS provision in the Clean Water Act, concluding that the Treatment as State provision includes an express delegation of authority by Congress to Indian tribes to administer regulatory programs over their entire reservations, subject to section 518(e)’s eligibility requirements.  This …

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A Blast from the Past

Sometimes you need a thick skin to be a scientist or scholar. Almost everyone, it seems, has encountered a reviewer who didn’t bother to read what you wrote or badly misunderstood what you said. In other cases, you realize on reflection that a reviewer’s criticisms, although annoying and even painful at first, are justified in …

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Rich TPACK Cases: Great Resource Book

The TPACK framework is a theoretical framework that seeks to influence practice. And most gratifyingly (for Matt Koehler and myself) it appears to have had a significant impact in that area. That said, the field lacked concrete, rich examples of TPACK in practice. Cases that would (quoting Darling-Hammond & Snyder) “add context to theory” highlighting the rich telling …

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Independent Streams (Week of May 23rd)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems: Flint Syndrome (link is external). Comparing the State of Michigan’s approach towards struggling municipalities with the State of Pennsylvania (link is external) and Ohio (link is external). Josh Sapotichne, IPPSR affiliated faculty and presenter at IPPSR’s forum on the Flint Water Crisis, extensively quoted in these two articles …

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What is a hero?

Does the hero die a hero, or does she survive?In our worship of the mortal champion for good, is it imperative that the hero dies in the at, or do we need her to live?What is this uniquely human construct of the hero? Why is it important for us to imagine the hero? Is the …

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10 Reasons Why I Bike

I spent the last weekend catching up after a busy past month and biked with my wife Katie around town, and, in the process, thought about why I bike. Here are 10 reasons why: It’s a good form of exercise. Biking, even just a mile or two, is good for my physical fitness, especially for …

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What a Waste!

Here we are as usual, a day late and a dollar short on the latest hip fad in food ethics. That, of course, would be food waste. We are so dang slow on this one that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has beaten us to it, having announced a major initiative on curbing food waste …

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If Detroiters See It, Will They Pay?

The study outlined here began with a question heard many times while working with the city’s finance department. That question was: If people don’t think they get enough from the city, why should they pay their taxes? That is a difficult one to answer, but first a little background. In Detroit, income taxes suffer low …

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Systems view of creativity & an interview with Michele Root-Bernstein

Our series of articles related to the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century in the journal TechTrends continues with two new articles. The first focuses on developing a systems view of creativity, specifically on how technology is opening up the world and changing systems of creativity. Henriksen, D., & Hoelting, M. (2016). A Systems View of …

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TPACK Newsletter #27, March 2016

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #27: March 2016 Special Spring 2016 Conference Issue Below please find a listing of TPACK-related papers/sessions that will be presented at the SITE conference in March in Savannah, Georgia; at the AERA annual meeting in April in Washington, DC; and at the ISTE conference in June in Denver, Colorado. (That’s 66 TPACK-related …

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TPACK Newsletter #26, February 2016

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #26: February 2016 Welcome to the twenty-sixth edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers. If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ …

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Africa’s Premier League

Africa is a Country‘s film division is working on an intriguing fútbol project that I just supported on Kickstarter. What’s it about? Africa’s Premier League is a film that follows four fans—in Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa and DR Congo—as they live through the highs and lows of a football season as a way to explore …

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Interview with Zeenat Kotval on the Gordie Howe International Bridge

Dr. Zeenat Kotval-Karamchandani (ZK) is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at Michigan State University. Her areas of research and teaching include sustainable development and transportation. Alexander Swindle is a policy fellow at IPPSR graduating in May 2017. A lightly-edited transcript of their interview follows. AS: At the IPPSR forum, you turned our …

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Independent Streams (Week of May 16th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems: Detroit students’ education take back seat in funding talks (link is external). IPPSR affiliate David Arsen comments on the extraordinary challenges Detroit faces, including teacher payroll shortages, deteriorating buildings, and overall shortcomings in quality of education. Michigan gets ‘F’ for tracking teachers (link is external). IPPSR affiliate …

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Enlightened Minds in a Darkening Time

It’s been more than a month since I finished reading two very insightful books, Sheldon Wolin’s Democracy Incorporated (2008) and John Ralston Saul’s The Collapse of Globalism. I have been wanting to write about them but have felt mentally paralyzed by fear that I could not possibly provide an adequate synopsis of their depth of …

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University quality and global rankings

University quality and global rankings The paper below is one of the best I’ve seen on university rankings. Yes, there is a univariate factor one might characterize as “university quality” that correlates across multiple measures. As I have long suspected, the THE (Times Higher Education) and QS rankings, which are partially survey/reputation based, are biased …

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Workshopping

The 4th Food Justice Workshop was held at MSU yesterday. There was some hand-wringing about “who is at the table.” Mostly academics was the answer, though a few people active in various community organizations dropped by for short stints. By the time we got around to the serious hand-wringing they had all gone home, as had …

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Can Gentrification mean Integration? Hopes for the Urban Neighborhood School

The Less-Considered Outcome of Gentrification Green & Write’s previous post about gentrification and neighborhood schools highlighted the more common criticism of gentrification and urban areas—as more affluent, mostly white, families move into a lower-cost city neighborhood, low-income families of color are often displaced, finding themselves excluded from the communities that have been their own for …

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Flipping DNA switches

The recently published SSGAC study (Nature News) found 74 genome-wide significant hits related to educational attainment, using a discovery sample of ~300k individuals. The UK Biobank sample of ~110k individuals was used as a replication check of the results. If both samples are combined as a discovery sample 162 SNPs are identified at genome-wide significance. …

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The ESSA’s New Transparency Requirements

The recently passed Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) received acclaim for scaling back the federal government’s role in accountability. But at the same time it loosened the accountability reins on states, it also bolstered transparency requirements. The biggest changes on this front are new requirements which add additional subgroups to existing school and district report …

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Moving Forward…

  Photo Credit: http://lubbockonline.com/stories/020310/fea_558112953.shtml#.VzMlBmO8lVc   In the wake of the Michael Butera situation with NAFME, there has been a lot of discussion about matters of equity and inclusion. But this will be a missed opportunity if no action is taken. Here are a few ideas–please suggest yours in the comments below… We need to make …

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74 SNP hits from SSGAC GWAS

The SSGAC discovery of 74 SNP hits on educational attainment (EA) is finally published in Nature. Nature News article. EA was used in order to assemble as large a sample as possible (~300k individuals). Specific cognitive scores are only available for a much smaller number of individuals. But SNPs associated with EA are likely to …

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Review – US IPR Center Senate Testimony on “Counterfeits and Their Impact on Consumer Health and Safety” – Application to Food Fraud Prevention?

Last week on April 27, 2016 the US Intellectual Property Rights Center presented US Senate testimony about the “Counterfeits and Their Impact on Consumer Health and Safety.” Food was not specifically mentioned but it is within scope. These law enforcement agencies are designed, built, and reinforced for enforcement and investigation.  This leads to the food …

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