American Cookery

First published in 1796, American Cookery by Amelia Simmons is considered the first true American cookbook, with recipes for such indigenous foods as pumpkins, cranberries, and cornmeal. Cookbooks published here previously were English in origin with food and recipes written for English audiences. American Cookery is the bedrock for all important cookbook collections and MSU Special …

More

Look Away, Stay True

Recently a fellow writer, Chelsea Biondolillo, posted on Facebook: “I’m wearying of the push to turn ourselves into clickbait so our writing can go viral and we can get paid.” A number of other writers chimed in along these same lines. I found myself responding: “Look away, stay true.” I mutter these words with some …

More

Lake Como and Florence photos

I was in Lake Como for a small meeting of ~30 people, including sovereign wealth, hedge, and pension fund heads, plus a few intellectuals and leading figures from government. Brexit made for extra excitement in our discussions. Hint to scaremongers: the smart money is not as scared as you have tried to make the public. …

More

Good teaching is good design

I just came across Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design and was immediately struck by how closely they paralleled what is essential for good teaching. All one has to do is replace the word “design” with “teaching” and I think we get 10 pretty good principles to follow (or think about). This is a game I have …

More

Independent Streams (Week of June 27th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems Flint Water Crisis: What’s Behind Civil Suit Against Three Companies? (link is external) IPPSR affiliate Eric Scorsone comments on the political implications of Flint and the continuing debate over who is responsible for the crisis. Booming Again: West Michigan’s Economy Is On A Roll (link …

More

One Last One on Food Waste

I have to bring this series of diatribes about food waste to a close, but there was one more thing that I wanted to write about when I started this thread six weeks ago. I’m reminded of a fascinating talk I heard from the former Vice President for Sustainability at Wal-Mart Stores Inc. It was …

More

Brexit: victory over the Hollow Men

Congratulations to Dominic Cummings, a formidable man. I met Dominic at SCI FOO in 2014. We talked long into the night, and I came away impressed with his tenacity and capability for long term planning. He urged me to study Bismarck. The Telegraph: The long war: how Vote Leave and the Eurosceptics won “Vote Leave, …

More

Enforcing Simultaneous Arrivals

I’m recapping here an answer to a modeling question that I just posted on a help forum. (Since it will now appear in two different places, let’s hope it’s correct!) The original poster (OP) was working on a routing model, in which vehicles (for which I will use and if needed as indices) are assigned …

More

The Football Bard of Iceland Makes History

Guðmundur Benediktsson who? On Wednesday, June 22, the 41-year-old Icelandic announcer’s emotional call of Iceland’s winning goal against Austria at Euro 2016 went viral. The moment was immediately enshrined into the unofficial Hall of Fame of soccer broadcasting. Benediktsson is no ordinary broadcaster. He played for Iceland from 1994 to 2001 and has coached steadily …

More

Review – Final Rule for FSMA Intentional Adulteration (Food Defense) Regarding Food Fraud and EMA

This is a detailed, 22-page review of the Food Fraud aspects or requirements of the recently published Food Safety Modernization Act Intentional Adulteration (Food Defense) Final Rule (FSMA-IA). In addition to regular contributors Spink & Moyer, we are pleased to add MSU’s Dr. Andrew Huff (College of Veterinary Medicine) and University of Auckland’s (NZ) Bradley …

More

Arthur Kroeber (Gavekal) on Chinese economy

Highly recommended. Kroeber gives a realistic assessment of the Chinese economy, covering topics such as historical development models, infrastructure investment, debt levels, SOEs vs private enterprise, corruption pre- and post-Xi, demographics, hukou reform, etc. In this episode of Sinica, we present an in-depth interview with Arthur Kroeber, founding partner and head of research for Gavekal …

More

IPPSR Develops List of Policy-Related data.michigan.gov Datasets

Want to learn about environmental contamination, Michigan school locations, or concealed weapons permits? The State of Michigan makes many datasets publicly available for public use. Using data.michigan.gov (link is external), IPPSR has created a list of datasheets potentially useful for policy research and analysis. All datasets have an API making it easy for anyone to access …

More

Independent Streams (Week of June 20th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems Tri-Counties Want To Make The State Focus On Mid-Michigan (link is external) IPPSR affiliate Eric Scorsone comments on the importance of creating policies to draw businesses and people to the Lansing area. Cities Need Basic Services For Economic Growth, Not Flashy Gimmicks, Experts Say (link …

More

EQ, IQ, and all that

This Quora answer, from a pyschology professor who works on personality psychometrics, illustrates well the difference between rigorous and non-rigorous research in this area. Some years ago a colleague and I tried to replicate Duckworth’s findings on Grit, but to no avail, although IIRC our sample size was roughly as large as hers. In our …

More

More Waste

We’ve been on a run of blogs focused on food waste. The topic can’t help but bring up memories of my Nana, an obsessively frugal woman whose closets always contained at least fifty rolls of toilet paper purchased with triple coupon savings at her neighborhood Publix supermarket. Although she never did, I imagine my Nana …

More

MathJax Whiplash

Technology is continuously evolving, and for the most part that’s good. Every now and then, though, the evolution starts to look like a random mutation … the kind that results in an apocalyptic virus, or mutants with superpowers, or something else that is much more appealing as a plot device in a movie or TV …

More

The Re-Emergence of Contract Buying: A Practice Rooted in Mid-20th Century Racism

Long after the explicit use of racist terms in laws, policies with important racial impacts can linger in past practices that marginalize minority communities. Beryl Satter’s Family Properties: How the Struggle Over Race and Real Estate Transformed Chicago and Urban America, describes a key historical case of mid-century real estate practices that led to entrenched …

More

CAP Summer Work Update #2

Since we last checked in we’ve had a busy week and a half.  The Abbot entrance landscape rejuvenation project is coming to a close, so we’ve been able to finish work there and move onto testing other research questions. U.S. Weather Bureau  Although the rejuvenation construction was not directly impacting the north west corner of the …

More

Hemingway’s cafes

WSJ: Hemingway’s Favorite Parisian Cafes, A tour of the literary Parisian cafes Hemingway’s generation made famous. For some reason they don’t mention Les Deux Magots! See also With Pascin at the Dôme: I always wondered who Hemingway had in mind as the dark sister when he wrote the short story With Pascin at the Dôme, which …

More

New TPACK book chapter

The  Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA), New Delhi, recently published a book titled “Resource Book on ICT Integrated Teacher Education.” Edited by Dr. Manas Ranjan Panigrahi it is available as an Open Educational Resource (OER) from the CEMCA website. The book has 5 chapters, including one co-authored by a team here at MSU. Complete reference (with link …

More

Of zombies and criminals

As the recall for products linked to sunflower seeds potentially contaminated with Listeria grows, I think this is a good time to talk about recalls. I feel like this is a bug I’m hearing more and more about in the news, and have sometimes wondered if it’s just me being more attentive to food safety …

More

I got it from my mama…

It’s May.  I am sitting in my studio apartment, looking at old take-out Chinese boxes with disgust and attempting to pack for my field season in China.  In only one bag. How many pairs of socks should I pack? How much instant coffee does a summer of data collection in Asia require? Can I really …

More

Takeaways from the Bryant Decision

As observers might have predicted from the oral argument in United States v. Bryant (opinion here), the government’s victory was not surprising. Of course, even a few years ago, this outcome was far from a foregone conclusion, as the 2005 Canby-Washburn-Sands debates in the Federal Sentencing Reporter suggested. A few takeaways: 1. Remarkable that the Court heaps …

More

Independent Streams (Week of June 13th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems Plight of Michigan’s Homeless Students Deserves Attention(link is external) (link is external) IPPSR affiliate Joshua Cowen’s research highlights unique challenges faced by homeless students in Michigan Can Cormorants Help Control Great Lakes Invaders?(link is external) (link is external) IPPSR affiliate Eric Freedman writes about the interaction between …

More

Foo Camp 2016

I was at Foo Camp the last few days. This year they kept the size a bit lower (last year was kind of a zoo) and I thought the vibe was a lot more relaxed and fun. Many thanks to the O’Reilly folks for running this wonderful meeting and for inviting me. My first time …

More

Can Gentrification mean Integration? Hopes for the Urban Neighborhood School

Part 2 of 2 The Less-Considered Outcome of Gentrification Green & Write’s previous post about gentrification and neighborhood schools highlighted the more common criticism of gentrification and urban areas—as more affluent, mostly white, families move into a lower-cost city neighborhood, low-income families of color are often displaced, finding themselves excluded from the communities that have …

More

Waste (at last)

So finally after last week’s silliness and the week before that’s semi-seriousness I want to circle back to the week before that’s deadpan no-foolin’ serious talk about the moral dimensions of food waste. I’ll start by apologizing to anyone who might have been offended by the sarcasm or by the flippancy implied by the way …

More

Roe’s scientists: original published papers

Gwern has provided scans of the original papers published by Anne Roe on studies of 64 eminent scientists. These papers include details concerning the selection of these individuals and the psychometric testing performed on them. Roe’s scientists — selected in their 40’s and 50’s for outstanding research contributions — scored much higher on a set …

More

Randomized Controlled Trials of Public Policy

At IPPSR, we are underway building a comprehensive database full of policy-relevant research. A large focus of the database is to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of public policy experimentation. These studies enable causal inference by randomly assigning a policy intervention to some people or areas and comparing the results to a control group. So far, …

More

Independent Streams (Week of June 6th)

Our weekly round-up of policy-relevant reads and IPPSR-connected research. Problems Conservation Criminology at MSU works to Defend the Rights of Nature and Wildlife Around the World (link is external) IPPSR affiliate Meredith Gore’s work in conservation criminology is highlighted. Longtime Couples Get In Sync, In Sickness and In Health (link is external) IPPSR affiliate William …

More

FIFA Appoints African Woman as Secretary General: A Preliminary Assessment

Fatma Samba Diop Samoura of Senegal, a career United Nations diplomat, was recently appointed by FIFA President Gianni Infantino as the world body’s new secretary general. “She will bring a fresh wind to FIFA—someone from outside,” Infantino declared. Listen to my radio interview with Assumpta Oturu as we discuss the significance of Samoura’s appointment and …

More

$1.2 trillion college loan bubble?

See also When everyone goes to college: a lesson from S. Korea. Returns to a “college education” are highly dependent on the intrinsic cognitive ability and work ethic of the individual. WSJ: College Loan Glut Worries Policy Makers The U.S. government over the last 15 years made a trillion-dollar investment to improve the nation’s workforce, …

More