Information Theory of Deep Neural Nets: “Information Bottleneck”

Written by: Stephen Hsu

Primary Source:  Information Processing

This talk discusses, in terms of information theory, how the hidden layers of a deep neural net (thought of as a Markov chain) create a compressed (coarse grained) representation of the input information. To date the success of neural networks has been a mainly empirical phenomenon, lacking a theoretical framework that explains how and why they work so well.

At ~44min someone asks how networks “know” to construct (local) feature detectors in the first few layers. I’m not sure I followed Tishby’s answer but it may be a consequence of the hierarchical structure of the data, not specific to the network or optimization.

Naftali (Tali) Tishby נפתלי תשבי

Physicist, professor of computer science and computational neuroscientist
The Ruth and Stan Flinkman professor of Brain Research
Benin school of Engineering and Computer Science
Edmond and Lilly Safra Center for Brain Sciences (ELSC)
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 96906 Israel

I work at the interfaces between computer science, physics, and biology which provide some of the most challenging problems in today’s science and technology. We focus on organizing computational principles that govern information processing in biology, at all levels. To this end, we employ and develop methods that stem from statistical physics, information theory and computational learning theory, to analyze biological data and develop biologically inspired algorithms that can account for the observed performance of biological systems. We hope to find simple yet powerful computational mechanisms that may characterize evolved and adaptive systems, from the molecular level to the whole computational brain and interacting populations.

Another Tishby talk on this subject.

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Stephen Hsu
Stephen Hsu is vice president for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University. He also serves as scientific adviser to BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute) and as a member of its Cognitive Genomics Lab. Hsu’s primary work has been in applications of quantum field theory, particularly to problems in quantum chromodynamics, dark energy, black holes, entropy bounds, and particle physics beyond the standard model. He has also made contributions to genomics and bioinformatics, the theory of modern finance, and in encryption and information security. Founder of two Silicon Valley companies—SafeWeb, a pioneer in SSL VPN (Secure Sockets Layer Virtual Private Networks) appliances, which was acquired by Symantec in 2003, and Robot Genius Inc., which developed anti-malware technologies—Hsu has given invited research seminars and colloquia at leading research universities and laboratories around the world.
Stephen Hsu

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