AI and Genomics, explained (2 videos)

Written by: Stephen Hsu

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This video is a nicely done short introduction to AI for non-specialists. It’s part of Shift Change, a six part series on automation and the future of work.

I came across the video when creator Joss Fong (Vox) contacted me about her new project on human genomics and genomic prediction. As readers know I think the two most impactful technologies over the next 20-30 years will be AI and genomics. So Fong is on the right track…

This is the best (non-technical) video I’ve seen on the coming genomic revolution. However, it’s from 2016 and does not focus on the machine learning / bioinformatic challenge of figuring out exactly which edits one should make — i.e., the part of the problem I work on :-)  For the real thing, see here.

From a recent talk I gave at a biomedical research institute:

Your children and grandchildren will not just be competing against other people. They will also compete in the marketplace with machines. The code run on these machines is improving every day, thanks to AI. Will the DNA code run by your descendants also need to improve?

Of course it’s not just about competition. How can we put a value on a healthy, long life? The ability to swim effortlessly across a pool or run fast and leap higher? To actually understand what Einstein did, in place of some vague second-hand words?

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Stephen Hsu
Stephen Hsu is vice president for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University. He also serves as scientific adviser to BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute) and as a member of its Cognitive Genomics Lab. Hsu’s primary work has been in applications of quantum field theory, particularly to problems in quantum chromodynamics, dark energy, black holes, entropy bounds, and particle physics beyond the standard model. He has also made contributions to genomics and bioinformatics, the theory of modern finance, and in encryption and information security. Founder of two Silicon Valley companies—SafeWeb, a pioneer in SSL VPN (Secure Sockets Layer Virtual Private Networks) appliances, which was acquired by Symantec in 2003, and Robot Genius Inc., which developed anti-malware technologies—Hsu has given invited research seminars and colloquia at leading research universities and laboratories around the world.
Stephen Hsu

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