Callback Cuts That Repeat

Written by: Paul Rubin

Primary Source: OR in an OB World, 06/19/18.

The following post is specific to the CPLEX integer programming solver. I have no idea whether it applies to other solvers, or even which other solver have cut callbacks.

Every so often, a user will discover that a callback routine they wrote has “rediscovered” a cut it previously generated. This can be a bit concerning at first, for a few reasons: it seems implausible, and therefore raises concerns of a bug someplace; it represents repeated work, and thus wasted effort; and it suggests at least the possibility of getting stuck in a loop, the programmatic equivalent of “Groundhog Day“. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.) As it happens, though, repeating the same cut can legitimately happen (though hopefully not too often).

First, I should probably define what I mean by callbacks here (although I’m tempted to assume that if you don’t know what I mean, you’ve already stopped reading). If you want to get your geek on, feel free to wade through the Wikipedia explanation of a callback function. In the context of CPLEX, what I’m referring to is a user-written function that CPLEX will call at certain points in the search process. I will focus on functions called when CPLEX is generating cuts to tighten the bound at a given node of the search tree (a “user cut callback” in their terminology) or when CPLEX thinks it has identified an integer-feasible solution better than the current incumbent (a “lazy constraint callback”). That terminology pertains to versions of CPLEX prior to 12.8, when those would be two separate (now “legacy”) callbacks. As of CPLEX version 12.8, there is a single (“generic”) type of callback, but generic callbacks continue to be called from multiple “contexts”, including those two (solving a node LP, checking a new candidate solution).

The purpose here is to let the user either generate a bound-tightening constraint (“user cut”) using particular knowledge of the problem structure, or to vet a candidate solution and, if unsuitable, issue a new constraint (“lazy constraint”) that cuts off that solution, again based on problem information not part of the original IP model. The latter is particularly common with decomposition techniques such as Benders decomposition.

So why would the same user cut or lazy constraint be generated more than once (other than due to a bug)? There are at least two, and possibly three, explanations.

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I'm an apostate mathematician, retired from a business school after 33 years of teaching mostly (but not exclusively) quantitative methods courses. My academic interests lie in operations research. I also study Tae Kwon Do a bit on the side.

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