Graduation Day!

It’s graduation weekend at my university and this morning we had our School of Social Work recognition ceremony. It’s a happy day. Faculty parade around in funny robes and hats. Family and friends come to applaud and honor the hard work their graduate has done. There’s no parking anywhere, but the usual campus hot spots …

More

Medicare needs you

Before there was Medicare, most older Americans did not have any or had insufficient health insurance coverage.   The marketplace didn’t (and doesn’t) work when it comes to health insurance.  This is especially true for older adults who, on average, have more medical bills than younger people. And because of that, they are unattractive to private …

More

And now what?

I’m writing this on Tuesday, November 8 although by the time I post it the election will presumably be over. I’ve voted. Now I’m trying to not watch the results as polls start to close. I’ll go to bed at my usual time (ridiculously early FYI) and wake up tomorrow to see what there is …

More

Caring for your abuser

Caregiving is a big topic these days.  It certainly comes up a lot in this blog. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine just published it’s most recent report on family caregiving.   I haven’t digested it yet so expect to see a future post with more detail.  I imagine, like most of the research …

More

Resilience and caring for someone with dementia

  Creative commons license miz_ginevera https://www.flickr.com/photos/ginevra/4603670503 Resilience is the ability to bounce back from a tough situation.  Most of us are pretty resilient. That doesn’t mean we don’t experience stress, sadness, anxiety and a host of other emotions when something bad happens, but over time we adapt.  This is particularly important when we’re faced with …

More

Advance care planning

A version of this post first appeared at https://www.seniorly.com/. Last week I wrote about understanding individuals’ wishes as a means of providing culturally sensitive palliative care.  That assumes the individual in question knows their wishes and can communicate them or has someone who can communicate for them. Advance care planning is one way to increase …

More

Bigger is better, but what you do with it counts too

Much of the research on welfare state development has argued  that economic prosperity (ie., GDP growth) is the key factor for expanding social policies.  Of course, economic prosperity is important. It doesn’t always, however, improve a population’s health.  The post-communist countries come to mind. This suggests that wealth is necessary for improving health, but it …

More

Person-centered care

Person-centered care is a current buzz word in health care. In one article, the core of person-centered care is described in this way: “patients are known as persons in context of their own social worlds, listened to, informed, respected, and involved in their care – and their wishes are honored (but not mindlessly enacted) during …

More

And so sabbatical ends

Next week, my sabbatical officially ends. As you can imagine, I reenter the academic fray with mixed feelings and a bit of trepidation. I really, really enjoyed my sabbatical. I mean, I really enjoyed it. So much that around March or April, I started worrying about having to come back. But now I’m looking forward …

More