Learning R

I have recently dedicated myself to learning R, a programming language and environment for focusing largely on statistical analysis and computing. The benefit of using R over other statistical computing packages is that it is free, open-source, and has a hugely active community around its use.  R can be used cross-platform  (PCs, Macs, and Linux) …

More

Parenting in Grad School

Parenting in grad school can be crazy hard. There is really so much to say about parenting in grad school. I asked the question on Twitter and on Facebook and was just overwhelmed with the responses. I have blogged on Gradhacker before about being a mother in academia. As I enter what is hopefully the …

More

Lessons from the Maker Movement

Making things is fun. The Maker movement, as it’s commonly known, is centered on the idea that when it comes to technology especially, it’s better and more fun to do-it-yourself than rely on off-the-shelf products. Here on GradHacker, we’ve discussed different ways we’ve gone about doing this to varying degrees. It’s true that GradHackers as …

More

GradHacker on Pinterest

GradHacker first discussed the social network Pinterest in April of 2012, and we are finally taking our own advice and setting up an account. As GradHacker Terry Brock described it in his post on the subject, “The tool itself is simple: when you find something you think is interesting,  you ‘pin’ it to a topical …

More

Balancing Privacy and a Public Web Presence

Recently evidence of a massive government surveillance program called PRISM has re-surfaced concerns about individual privacy. Here at Gradhacker, we’ve blogged about the need for a public web presence in grad school, primarily in order to facilitate networking, sharing researching, and job searching. While these discussions have included ideas about what to share and what …

More

Secret Lives of Grad Students

A few weeks ago I stumbled across this essay by Amy Boesky in The Kenyon Review that reflected on her time ghostwriting for the Sweet Valley High series. What caught my attention was the fact that she wrote for the series throughout her time as a doctoral student (okay, I admit it–I  actually started reading because I …

More

GradHacking the MOOC

It is undeniable that we are currently living in the time of the MOOC (Massively Open Online Course, just in case you were catching up on Downton Abbey and missed it). Every day new headlines pop up at Inside Higher Ed and The New York Times discussing the impact of MOOCs, who’s joined forces with …

More

Thoughts on MOOCs

So it’s been an interesting start to 2013 for the state of MOOCs. First I want to reflect on the recent disaster at Coursera in a course entitled “Fundamentals of Online Education” in which the course was forced to close down after a series of unfortunate events. The irony of the failure of an online …

More

Learning to Code

So it’s come to your attention that, *gulp*, you are going to have to learn to code something. This is happening more and more across disciplines: be it the explosion of interest in digital humanities, robust software or support data analysis, more and more graduate students are finding themselves moving beyond the WSYIWYG toolbars and …

More