Evolution of a (data) visualization

Last summer, I taught the MAET Year 2 Summer Cohort with Danah Henriksen. After teaching the class, Danah realized she had taught five cohorts of (awesome) students and that we had some information available from pre- and post-course self-reported surveys to understand how students grew in terms of their confidence in using different educational (and …

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Teaching Soccer Online: 2018 Edition

  A couple of weeks ago, I was mired in grading final papers and exams when I received the first student emails about my “Global Soccer” online summer course. “Professor,” an eager young man wrote, “I’m really excited about taking your soccer class and want to get an early start.” His enthusiasm, while obviously welcome, …

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AERA 2018 presentation: Patterns of engagement in a flipped undergraduate class (slides, paper, & code)

I’m presenting a second paper at AERA on patterns of (outside of class) engagement in a flipped undergraduate class with my colleagues You-kyung Lee, Kristy Robinson, John Ranellucci, Cary Roseth, and Lisa Linnenbrink-Garcia. The presentation is at 8:15 am (Sunday, 4/15) in the Millenium Broadway Hotel (Room 7.04) and is on a session on emotions, …

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AERA 2018 presentation: How engagement during out-of-school STEM programs promotes the development of interest (slides, paper, & code)

I’m excited to present a paper on how engagement during out-of-school STEM programs promotes youths’ development of interest with my co-authors Patrick Beymer and Jennifer Schmidt. The paper is in the session “Data-Intensive Approaches to Studying Engagement in Education: Exploring Their Current Potential”. My co-presenters in the session include Eric Weibe and James Creager, Sophia …

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SITE 2018 The Quickfire Challenge Roundtable: How to fail fast & learn while having fun

We (Candace & Leigh) are honored to present at SITE 2018. This blog post will serve as our guide and “handout” for our roundtable session. Inspired by reality TV cooking shows, the “Quickfire Challenge” is an educational tool created as an activity in the Master of Arts in Educational Technology (MAET) program at Michigan State University (Wolf, 2009). Over the …

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New Publication: Hacking Structures: Educational Technology Programs, Evaluation, and Transformation

I was elated to see the tweet from Michelle this morning that our chapter “Hacking Structures: Educational Technology Programs, Evaluation, and Transformation” in Hacking Education in a Digital Age Teacher Education, Curriculum, and Literacies has been published! I’m so proud of this chapter (and what led us to write the chapter.) Can’t wait to get a copy to see the words …

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New publication: Strategies, Use, and Impact of Social Media for Supporting Teacher Community within Professional Development: The Case of One Urban STEM Program

Just over a month ago, an article by Josh Rosenberg, me, Leigh Graves Wolf, and Matt Koehler appeared in the Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching. This is—perhaps obviously—a continuation of some of our previous work on Twitter hashtags in graduate education, but this piece took a particular look at social media use, …

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The Content of their Character: Ed Blum and Jian Li

See 20 years @15 percent: does Harvard discriminate against Asian-Americans? The excerpt below is from the Harvard lawsuit brief, recalling the parallel between what had been done to limit Jewish enrollment in the early 20th century, and the current situation with Asian-Americans. … Harvard is engaging in racial balancing. Over an extended period, Harvard’s admission and enrollment …

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Outcomes from a self-generated utility value intervention in science (in IJER)

The Scientific Practices project, was focused on engaging middle school students in scientific and engineering practices (such as developing and using models, constructing explanations of phenomena, and analyzing and interpreting data). As part of this longitudinal project, we carried out field experiments to understand the impact of specific features of the curriculum. In this paper published …

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Low SES does not decrease heritability of cognitive ability (N=300k)

These researchers, from Stanford, Northwestern, and the University of Florida, analyze a large population of twins and siblings (~24k twins and ~300k children in total, born 1994-2002 in Florida). They find no evidence of SES (Socio-Economic Status) moderation of genetic influence on test scores (i.e., cognitive ability). The figure above shows the usual pattern of lower pairwise …

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DOJ invokes Title VI against Harvard admissions

“Elections have consequences…” — Barack Obama See 20 years @15 percent: does Harvard discriminate against Asian-Americans? CNN: The Justice Department is actively investigating Harvard University’s use of race in its admissions policies and has concluded the school is “out of compliance” with federal law, according to documents obtained by CNN. … [Click through for DOJ …

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The Philosophers’ Way

Sometimes we forget … forget to take a break, forget to get outside, and forget to reflect on our individual and collective pasts. After an intense three days of talks at EMBO—hearing about exciting work by diverse and superb biologists in 13-minute chunks (plus Q&A); seeing dear friends Santiago Elena, Sebastian Bonhoeffer, and Roy Kishony; …

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Getting started with ‘open science’ through blogging

Through a few different projects and people (such as SIPS and rOpenSci and conversations with friends / colleagues both online and offline), I have been exposed to the idea of open science. I’m actually going to punt for the moment. Here’s a definition that sounds about right to me: Open science is the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible …

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A person-in-context approach to student engagement in science (article in JRST)

Over the past few years, I have worked with Jennifer Schmidt and Patrick Beymer to explore student engagement in science using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). Most recently, we used what scholars have referred to as a “person-in-context” approach, using both ESM and a person-oriented approach. A figure is helpful for conveying how the person-oriented approach can be used to …

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Is there such a thing as “white hat” research ethics violations?

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about some of the ethical dilemmas involved in using public data for research, using an example of facial recognition researchers who used YouTube videos of people undergoing hormone replacement therapy to improve their algorithms’ ability to recognize faces from pre- and post-transition. Since reading that article, I’ve seen the occasional …

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Recognizing Advisors

Advisors empower students to make life-altering decisions for themselves, armed with the best possible information. On Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 I had the opportunity to speak at the first annual MSU Advisor Recognition Ceremony. Advising is a unique academic role on campus: in this role, advisors need to carefully balance giving students accurate and realistic …

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Public data and digital research ethics

The Verge recently posted an article that highlights some of the ethical dilemmas involved in collecting publicly-available data for research purposes. The article begins by describing the work of a researcher working on facial recognition of people before and after hormone replacement therapy: On YouTube, he found a treasure trove. Individuals undergoing HRT often document their progress …

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How to be an effective acting director, chair or dean — Part II (essay)

Last week, Inside Higher Ed published an essay of mine describing my experience as an interim dean. It covered several practical, task-oriented topics: identifying one’s core mission for the interim period, allaying colleagues’ fears, acquiring reliable information and triaging the issues that land in your inbox. But leading a college that includes a department of theater helped me recognize …

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Lessons from the field

As glamorous and thrilling as fieldwork might sound, no field season is complete without a few tales, typically funnier after the fact. Here’s my attempt to impart some humor and share lessons learned after the emotional trauma subsided. Lesson #1: Try new things but acknowledge your limits The second day of our trip, I was …

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A day in the field

3:00 a.m. My alarm goes off. I open my eyes and see the Heilongjiang sun starting to rise. I close my eyes just for a minute more… (Editor’s note – China, while geographically spanning five time zones, follows only one for unity. That means far eastern locales like Heilongjiang see daybreak early.) 3:15 a.m. My …

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#JALTCALL2017 Virtual Plenary | Design thinking: Going from practice to theory and theory to practice

It was an honor to be a virtual plenary at the JALTCALL 2017 conference last night. JALTCALL is a Special Interest Groups (SIG) of JALT (Japan Association for Language Teaching) for educators and researchers who share an interest in digital technology and language learning. Unfortunately, I was unable to make it in person – but we were able to coordinate …

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Comprehensive Exams, Candidacy Exams and the Job Market: More than the Life of the Mind

The article below is a re-post from the Spring 2017 American Sociological Association Sociology of Development newsletter (see the pdf here: https://sociologyofdevelopment.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/spring-2017-socdev-newsletter-4-11.pdf). The newness of the sub-field of sociology of development means it shares some things in common with an interdisciplinary field such as science and technology studies, namely, dispersed resources, disputes about the canonical …

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