Digital Collections, Data Visualization, and Accessibility: What to Do? (repost)

[This is another crosspost from the Digital Scholarship Collaborative Sandbox blog from the MSU Libraries. The original blog post can be read there.] In my earlier post “Digital Collections and Accessibility”, I touched upon the considerations we would need to address when building or creating digital collections (or other things that rely heavily on utilizing …

More

Digital Media’s Demands and Yields

In lieu of telling you where this budding Media Preservation program and I are at in our fourth month together, I’m going to share a few basic concepts of the field, before steering slightly toward digital scholarship and a few tools/resources that might excite you. In other words, I’ll keep it light, and will share …

More

Waiting

On Wednesday I asked the students in my class to describe what they’d been doing earlier in the day, before our afternoon session began. While they scribbled I wrote alongside them, producing a dull summary of actions and toil—until I came to waiting … There is always waiting. It begins in the still-dark morning when …

More

Oral History and Digital Humanities

All fields in the humanities have been transformed by digital technology, but none more so than oral history.  The new book, Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement, published by Palgrave Macmillan, explores the impact that new technologies have had on the field.  Edited by Doug Boyd and Mary Larson, the essays in the …

More

Digital Collections and Accessibility

[This is a crosspost from the Digital Scholarship Collaborative Sandbox blog from the MSU Libraries.  The original blog post can be read there.  Do visit the blog and read the other posts written by my colleagues as well.] Like many other academic libraries, our collection consists of not only print materials, but also electronic collections. Typical …

More

Library Collections as Humanities Data

Devin Higgins and I, recently published a paper [PDF] that argues for thinking about library collections as Humanities data. It instantiates some of the conversations we’ve been having at MSU Libraries around thinking about how we, and the general library community, might better promote and enable use of library collections for Digital Humanists. I’ve said …

More

Metadata = MetaGold?

If there is one thing that most libraries, archives, and museums have in bulk, it’s collections metadata. It’s the data that describes content in the collections. This stuff is added, updated, and augmented nearly everyday. Overtime and at sufficient scale it can give insight into the contours of a particular field – author gender distribution, co-citation …

More

Network Detroit

Today, I attended the dh conference, Network Detroit, and presented on the Public Philosophy Journal (http://publicphilosophyjournal.org/), in a talk entitled, “Reimagining Scholarly Publishing and the Public Philosophy Journal.”  It is a wonderful regional conference that attracts many DHers from the midwest and beyond.  The conference is in its second year, held at Lawrence Tech, and wonderfully …

More

Humanities Data

Yesterday, I talked with a group of folks in the History Department about this thing we’ve been kicking around the library called “Humanities Data”. Thanks to Dean Rehberger for the invite, and thanks also to Brandon Locke for hosting us in the newly launched LEADR lab. The presentation itself was in part a product of some writing Devin Higgins and I have been …

More

The Infinite Jukebox

Didn’t get enough “Scatman” in the 90s? Now you can potentially loop those “ski-ba-bop-ba-dop-bop’s” for-ever with The Infinite Jukebox, “for when your favorite song just isn’t long enough.” This web app uses “the Echo Nest analyzer to break the song into beats…but at every beat there’s a chance that we will jump to a different …

More

Digital Environments: Design & Consequence

Wrapping up a great visit to San Jose, Costa Rica for the World History Association Conference. I delivered a paper, ‘Digital Environments: Design and Consequence”, and was joined by panelists Trevor Getz and Olivia Guntarik. During my talk I picked and pulled (responsibly, I hope) from Humanities Computing, Digital Humanities, and Library and Information Science …

More

Storify: Simplified

Storify is a social media platform with the goal of telling stories or narratives through other social media posts. With a layout that’s a hybrid of Facebook and Pinterest, this platform is quickly gaining an audience with social media “storytellers”. Storify is probably most commonly used in articles to report on events that are heavily …

More

Digital Humanities at MSU

This past year I had the fun assignment of co-chairing a committee on the digital humanities for the CIC (as most of you know, the CIC or Committee on Institutional Cooperation is a consortium of BigTen universities plus the University of Chicago). The charge of the committee was to find out what the CIC and its member institutions could do …

More

Queering Digital Humanities

Recently on the Humanist Discussion Group, Willard McCarty posed a bit of a challenge. He explained “Recently I found myself in a hotel lift with a colleague who had attended the same conference but with whom I had not previously spoken. I asked him what he was working on, or interested in, or some such …

More

Zombie Apocalypse and the Digital Humanities

I was reading Gary Olson’s post in The Chronicle, “How Not to Reform Humanities Scholarship,”  (http://chronicle.com/article/How-Not-to-Reform-Humanities/130675/) and it reminded me of the wonderful opening scene in Romero’s Night of the Living Dead (1968).  Barbra’s brother is teasing her with, “They’re coming to get you, Barbra, they’re coming to get you.”  In Olson’s palaver, and ones like it (I …

More