From the Beginning

It was five years ago today I transferred my meanderings since the mid 90s into this blog. 246 blog entries preceded this one with another dozen or so that never got past the draft stage. Probably many of the 246 should have stayed as drafts. So the occasion caused me to go back and look …

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Graduation Day!

It’s graduation weekend at my university and this morning we had our School of Social Work recognition ceremony. It’s a happy day. Faculty parade around in funny robes and hats. Family and friends come to applaud and honor the hard work their graduate has done. There’s no parking anywhere, but the usual campus hot spots …

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Medicare needs you

Before there was Medicare, most older Americans did not have any or had insufficient health insurance coverage.   The marketplace didn’t (and doesn’t) work when it comes to health insurance.  This is especially true for older adults who, on average, have more medical bills than younger people. And because of that, they are unattractive to private …

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Caring for your abuser

Caregiving is a big topic these days.  It certainly comes up a lot in this blog. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine just published it’s most recent report on family caregiving.   I haven’t digested it yet so expect to see a future post with more detail.  I imagine, like most of the research …

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Resilience and caring for someone with dementia

  Creative commons license miz_ginevera https://www.flickr.com/photos/ginevra/4603670503 Resilience is the ability to bounce back from a tough situation.  Most of us are pretty resilient. That doesn’t mean we don’t experience stress, sadness, anxiety and a host of other emotions when something bad happens, but over time we adapt.  This is particularly important when we’re faced with …

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Advance care planning

A version of this post first appeared at https://www.seniorly.com/. Last week I wrote about understanding individuals’ wishes as a means of providing culturally sensitive palliative care.  That assumes the individual in question knows their wishes and can communicate them or has someone who can communicate for them. Advance care planning is one way to increase …

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Bigger is better, but what you do with it counts too

Much of the research on welfare state development has argued  that economic prosperity (ie., GDP growth) is the key factor for expanding social policies.  Of course, economic prosperity is important. It doesn’t always, however, improve a population’s health.  The post-communist countries come to mind. This suggests that wealth is necessary for improving health, but it …

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Person-centered care

Person-centered care is a current buzz word in health care. In one article, the core of person-centered care is described in this way: “patients are known as persons in context of their own social worlds, listened to, informed, respected, and involved in their care – and their wishes are honored (but not mindlessly enacted) during …

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Four Little Questions

What is your understanding of the situation and its potential outcomes? What are your fears and what are your hopes? What are the trade-offs you are willing to make and not willing to make? What is the course of action that best serves this understanding? Could these four little questions – that appear and reappear …

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Article update: Implementing evidence-based practice in underrepresented communities

I am a believer in the importance of social workers (and other health and social service professionals) using research evidence to inform their practice. That’s why I spend hours teaching reluctant social work students statistics and research methods and how to evaluate the quality of a research study. I am also straightforward about the challenges …

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