Blogging Bioarchaeology: Open Access Publication Now Available!

I’m happy to announce that my journal article with Kristina Killgrove (poweredbyosteons.org) on blogging bioarchaeology has finally published! It is featured in a special Internet Archaeology issue that was created by Colleen Morgan and Judith Winters. You can read the full open access article online here: Bones, Bodies, and Blogs: Outreach and Engagement in Bioarchaeology Meyers …

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Mostly Dead, but Slightly Alive: The Life After Death of Dismembered Remains in Ancient Peru

In the Princess Bride, the deceased body of Westley is brought to Miracle Max in order to bring him back to life. Famously, May says ‘There’s a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive’ (Goldman 2007 from Arnold 2014). In the new issue of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal, there is a focus on …

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What did the Egyptians eat?

There’s something mystical and wonderful about Ancient Egypt. It is one of the first historical eras that really captured my imagination as a child. In many ways, I think this mystique surrounding the era is due more to the fact that there is so many gaps in our understanding and knowledge of this great civilization. …

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What did Genghis Khan eat?

Everyone knows something about Genghis Khan. His story and empire is part of the basic history of the world we learn growing up. He came into power by uniting disparate tribal groups of Northeastern Asia. His Mongol invasions over the early 13th century AD resulted in the massacre of thousands of people and unification of …

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Post-Mortal Embraces in Siberia

I’ve been thinking quite a bit about love recently- primarily because I recently became engaged, but also because I’ve been seeing increasingly more images of skeletons in an embrace. An recent article from the Siberian Times reported on the finding of hundreds of tombs from a Staryi Tartas village, in the Novosibirsk region of Russia. Within …

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Happy 2nd Birthday BDL!

It’s officially been two years since I first started ‘Bones Don’t Lie’ as a way to share bioarchaeology and mortuary archaeology news with the world! Over this last year I’ve had a number of changes to the blog and some major events. Earlier this year I completely redesigned the website from its original brown tone …

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A Hole in the Head: Trepanation

Trepanation, or trephination, has fascinated the Western academic world since the mid-19th century when Ephraim Squier discovered a trepanned skull in Cuzco, Peru. ”Trepanation is the removal of a bone piece of the skull of a living individual without penetration of the underlying soft tissue” according to Erdal and Erdal (2011). The word trepanation in latin …

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