Getting started with ‘open science’ through blogging

Through a few different projects and people (such as SIPS and rOpenSci and conversations with friends / colleagues both online and offline), I have been exposed to the idea of open science. I’m actually going to punt for the moment. Here’s a definition that sounds about right to me: Open science is the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible …

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Bot Angels in the Food World

There’s something serious to be said about robots and their persistent intrusion into the food world. But saying it requires a bit of set up, so don’t expect anything too serious in this week’s blog. We got off on robots years ago when any blogger was going to be beset by dozens of computer programs—bots, …

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Catalytic Opportunities

Continuing my experiment in public writing along the way, this post on Medium outlines the contours of what I’ve been thinking about as “catalytic opportunities.” I’ve begun thinking about strategic initiatives as catalytic. In chemistry, a catalyst causes a chemical reaction without itself being affected. But this isn’t exactly what I have in mind, because …

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Some Fishy News

Here is a post for those Thornapple Blog readers who rely on me to keep them informed of all the doings in the murky world of food regulatory policy. Of course I have to caution any other innocent soul who happens to have stumbled onto the Blog that the readers who rely on me to …

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Enter Title Here

I might as well start out today by just admitting up front that it’s not really proving to be particularly conducive to blogging. I mean, what is this blogging thing, anyway? (Sounds like the start of a Seinfeld monologue, doesn’t it?). There was a particular idea to it back in the stone age years of …

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Blogging Bioarchaeology: Open Access Publication Now Available!

I’m happy to announce that my journal article with Kristina Killgrove (poweredbyosteons.org) on blogging bioarchaeology has finally published! It is featured in a special Internet Archaeology issue that was created by Colleen Morgan and Judith Winters. You can read the full open access article online here: Bones, Bodies, and Blogs: Outreach and Engagement in Bioarchaeology Meyers …

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The Worst Blog of the Year

So this week haul out that old Andy Williams Christmas record and hum the following to the tune of “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!”   It’s the least creative blog of the year With the stereo blaring And everyone telling you “Christmas is here!” It’s the least creative blog of the year …

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Plastic Houses

There’s an old saying to the effect that people who live in glass houses should not throw stones. Good advice for bloggers, I think. If you are “out there” and visible, you should think twice about digging in to someone for something that you could be dug into yourself. There’s also a variation on the …

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Two reflections on SCI FOO 2014

Two excellent blog posts on SCI FOO by Jacob Vanderplas (Astronomer and Data Scientist at the University of Washington) and Dominic Cummings (former director of strategy for the conservative party in the UK). Hacking Academia: Data Science and the University (Vanderplas) Almost a year ago, I wrote a post I called the Big Data Brain Drain, lamenting the …

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Summer Cyborg Mailbag

Maybe it’s time for another Thornapple blog complaining about the robots in our midst. As my many legions of irregular readers may have surmised, I have become somewhat reconciled to many robotic presences during the years that I’ve been writing the blog. Anyone who runs a website with an opportunity for “Comments” goes through a …

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One Thing or Another

Diane and I have spent a chunk of the morning trying figure out where we can get a new Garden Bandit™. This can only mean one thing. The weeds are coming up and something needs to be done about them. We bought our current Garden Bandit™ in Stratford, Ontario a few years back when we were …

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Celebrating 2 years of research blogging by analyzing my blog

In May 2012, I started this blog to rave about the IPython Notebook, a new scientific computing tool that’s still an integral part of my research workflow today. Two years have passed, and I’ve written about a breadth of topics ranging from statistics tutorials to science outreach to my PhD research to evolution to chess… and even the world’s deadliest actors. This blog has proven to …

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