The Rise and Fall of Common Assessments

In 1984, President Reagan’s Secretary of Education, Terrel Bell, introduced a new innovation at the Department of Education (ED). It was called the “wall chart”, and it ranked all 50 states’ educational systems on the basis of their average SAT scores. It was an admittedly crude measure of educational effectiveness. After all, no school’s curriculum …

More

The Common Core Heats Up

With the recent announcement of Hilary Clinton as the leading Democratic nominee for the next presidential election, we are already “off to the races” for 2016. Even though just a few years ago the Common Core was enacted in most states with little political fanfare, early analysis suggests that the standards are positioned to be …

More

Instructional Coaching Policy, Part 2

Last week, this Common Core and Curriculum blog introduced instructional coaching policy as a recent reform designed to create and develop instructional capacity. While last week’s article focused on situating instructional coaching in the broader policy environment, the focus of this week’s article is the “nuts and bolts” of coaching. Jack of All Trades In …

More

Instructional Coaching Policy, Part 1

This week’s Green & Write post will be the first in a two-part series on instructional coaching. In recent years, instructional coaching has emerged as an important policy lever for implementing curricular reform. Michigan, along with many other states, specifically includes instructional coaching in its ESEA waiver as a policy solution for struggling districts that …

More

Engaging in Educational Policy Issues

Last week, the College of Education launched its new educational policy blog, Green & Write.  The blog, coordinated by faculty member and educational policy expert Rebecca Jacobsen, focuses on four main topics: Teacher quality; Common Core and curriculum standards; Student accountability and assessment; and Governance and finance issues. The purpose of the blog is articulated …

More