Greg Ablavsky Commentary on Upper Skagit Decision

Gregory Ablavsky has posted “Upper Skagit v. Lundgren: Deceptively Straightforward Case Raises Fundamental Questions about Native Nations, History, and Sovereignty” on Stanford Law School’s blog. Here are excerpts: This decision provoked the ire of Justice Thomas, who, in a lengthy dissent, insisted that the immovable property exception did apply to tribes.  Thomas’s rationale involved a deep dive …

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Jenn Weddle Guest Post on Upper Skagit Decision

The Upper Skagit Court’s restraint Monday is appreciated in Indian Country.  A “hornbook” law principle is that tribes need not suffer litigation unless and until either the tribe or Congress expressly says so.  Monday’s Upper Skagit opinion affords appropriate time for further advocacy and lower court consideration as to whether that hornbook principle should be displaced by another—the immovable …

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Proposed Court Rule in Michigan to Waive Pro Hac Fees and Other Limits for Out of State Tribal ICWA Attorneys

Here. In ICWA cases, the tribe has a right of intervention in whatever state court is hearing the case of the tribal child. While it is true that the “tribal representative” does not have to be attorneys, when they are attorneys, there may be concerns about practicing without finding local counsel or using the local “pro hac” …

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