Announcing clustRcompaR v.0.1.0

Announcing clustRcompaR v.0.1.0 Alex Lishinski and I worked on an R package over the last year or so. We are excited that it’s now available on CRAN. You can install the package using install.packages(‘clustRcompaR’) (only needed first time) and load it (more on its two functions below) using library(clustRcompaR). Here’s a description: Provides an interface …

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Critical Diversity in a Digital Age

Last year we developed a strategic plan in the College of Arts & Letters that called for a cluster hire in culturally engaged digital humanities that focuses on humanities questions of race, inclusion, cultural preservation, global interconnectedness, and engaged scholarship. This fall, we sent out a call for proposals to the chairs and program directors inviting them to envision a …

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Becoming a Digital Scholar

Recently, I’ve posted a couple of times on my efforts to make connections with the world of digital humanities. This week, I continue those efforts by attending for the first time a Digital Humanities methods seminar that I’ve enrolled in. As I’ve mentioned in those previous posts, I’m still working to figure out if/how I—an …

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Going Viral With Your Scholarship

In a way, it all began with this picture. I was attending my first Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC) conference in Ann Arbor to talk about digital scholarship and I didn’t know many people. I was committed to living out my fundamental commitment to use digital modes of communication to cultivate an academic community …

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Broad Data Praxis

short talk delivered during ALA Midwinter 2016, LITA Top Tech Trends Panel Today, I’d like to discuss a trend I call broad data praxis. Data praxis itself is the combination of the theory and the practice of working with data. Typically, data praxis is naturalized within a particular discipline. There is a long tradition of data …

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Twisty Little Passages: The Franklin D. Roosevelt Master Speech File

Last week the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum announced online availability of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Master Speech File. The collection contains 1,592 documents, totaling 46,000 pages, spanning the years 1898-1945. This is an essential set of primary sources, and given availability in digital form they become amenable to research questions that can be extended via …

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Never Neutral: Digital Library as Argument

At this year’s DLF Forum, Chris Bourg, Cecily Walker, and Safiya Noble powerfully drove home the responsibility that the digital library community has to reflect critically as it shapes the contours of the digital environment. We must be vigilantly aware of how our decisions accrete toward a constellation of world views that simultaneously foreclose and expand conditions …

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Kludging: Web to TXT

Text analysis projects share in common 3 challenges. First, data of interest must be found. Second, data must be gettable. Third, if it’s not already formed according to wildest dreams, ways must be known of getting data into a state that they are readily usable with desired methods and tools. While surmounting these challenges are typically …

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DH 2015: Coalescing Frames

The main program of DH 2015 has come to a close. My thanks to the organizers for an intellectually challenging conference. My thanks especially to the brave individuals that forcefully problematized DH as community – who is in, who is out? | who is named, who is not named? | global, really? | inclusivity on whose …

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Representing Data with Sound (sonification)

When it’s said a picture is worth a thousand words, it generally is. Data visualization provides information that otherwise might take several paragraphs to explain. Yet, this technique privileges users that have sight. What techniques can be used for users that rely on screen readers to access information? I recently discovered[1] a project by University …

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Youtube Data for Research

Sometimes I interact with folks interested in digital projects that entail some form of video analysis. These noble hypothetical folk, whether they know it or not, join a quest to augment Digital Humanities discourse with a format that doesn’t get enough attention. Brave souls. Just for starters, video data sources can be tough to gain access to. For projects …

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Finding the Digital Humanities

While popular retelling likes to place the origins of the “digital humanities” with John Unsworth and the entitling of the volume, A Companion to Digital Humanities, the term has earlier origins and DH first began appearing in 1998.  The term is often associated appropriately with one of the pioneers in digital projects, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). In November of …

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Digital Collections, Data Visualization, and Accessibility: What to Do? (repost)

[This is another crosspost from the Digital Scholarship Collaborative Sandbox blog from the MSU Libraries. The original blog post can be read there.] In my earlier post “Digital Collections and Accessibility”, I touched upon the considerations we would need to address when building or creating digital collections (or other things that rely heavily on utilizing …

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Digital Media’s Demands and Yields

In lieu of telling you where this budding Media Preservation program and I are at in our fourth month together, I’m going to share a few basic concepts of the field, before steering slightly toward digital scholarship and a few tools/resources that might excite you. In other words, I’ll keep it light, and will share …

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Oral History and Digital Humanities

All fields in the humanities have been transformed by digital technology, but none more so than oral history.  The new book, Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement, published by Palgrave Macmillan, explores the impact that new technologies have had on the field.  Edited by Doug Boyd and Mary Larson, the essays in the …

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AHA 2015: Data for Historical Research

At Kalani Craig’s invitation I had the great pleasure of joining a rockstar cast of instructors for the AHA Getting Started in Digital History workshop series. During my workshop, “Data for Historical Research” (slides below), I cast a pretty wide net. The general purpose was to: recast common historical objects of inquiry (audio, text, video, …

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Digital Collections and Accessibility

[This is a crosspost from the Digital Scholarship Collaborative Sandbox blog from the MSU Libraries.  The original blog post can be read there.  Do visit the blog and read the other posts written by my colleagues as well.] Like many other academic libraries, our collection consists of not only print materials, but also electronic collections. Typical …

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Library Collections as Humanities Data

Devin Higgins and I, recently published a paper [PDF] that argues for thinking about library collections as Humanities data. It instantiates some of the conversations we’ve been having at MSU Libraries around thinking about how we, and the general library community, might better promote and enable use of library collections for Digital Humanists. I’ve said …

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Metadata = MetaGold?

If there is one thing that most libraries, archives, and museums have in bulk, it’s collections metadata. It’s the data that describes content in the collections. This stuff is added, updated, and augmented nearly everyday. Overtime and at sufficient scale it can give insight into the contours of a particular field – author gender distribution, co-citation …

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Network Detroit

Today, I attended the dh conference, Network Detroit, and presented on the Public Philosophy Journal (http://publicphilosophyjournal.org/), in a talk entitled, “Reimagining Scholarly Publishing and the Public Philosophy Journal.”  It is a wonderful regional conference that attracts many DHers from the midwest and beyond.  The conference is in its second year, held at Lawrence Tech, and wonderfully …

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Humanities Data

Yesterday, I talked with a group of folks in the History Department about this thing we’ve been kicking around the library called “Humanities Data”. Thanks to Dean Rehberger for the invite, and thanks also to Brandon Locke for hosting us in the newly launched LEADR lab. The presentation itself was in part a product of some writing Devin Higgins and I have been …

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The Infinite Jukebox

Didn’t get enough “Scatman” in the 90s? Now you can potentially loop those “ski-ba-bop-ba-dop-bop’s” for-ever with The Infinite Jukebox, “for when your favorite song just isn’t long enough.” This web app uses “the Echo Nest analyzer to break the song into beats…but at every beat there’s a chance that we will jump to a different …

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Digital Environments: Design & Consequence

Wrapping up a great visit to San Jose, Costa Rica for the World History Association Conference. I delivered a paper, ‘Digital Environments: Design and Consequence”, and was joined by panelists Trevor Getz and Olivia Guntarik. During my talk I picked and pulled (responsibly, I hope) from Humanities Computing, Digital Humanities, and Library and Information Science …

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Storify: Simplified

Storify is a social media platform with the goal of telling stories or narratives through other social media posts. With a layout that’s a hybrid of Facebook and Pinterest, this platform is quickly gaining an audience with social media “storytellers”. Storify is probably most commonly used in articles to report on events that are heavily …

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10 Free Infographic Tools

Sometimes, it just isn’t feasible to create a graphic from scratch on Photoshop or InDesign. We simply don’t have enough hours in the day. That’s where easy-to-use infographic websites, such as Creative Bloq’s Ten Free Tools for Creating Infographics come in handy to speed up the process. For the simplest, easy-to-use option, Easel.ly or Venngage …

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The Gap: Developing Taste into Skill

Ira Glass’ advice on creative work has been gaining momentum for months, but even if you’ve read or heard the advice before, these two gorgeous typographical videos are worth a look. Ira Glass on Storytelling from David Shiyang Liu on Vimeo. One of the most resonant things that Glass addresses is “The Gap”. Creators usually …

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Hack, a new programming language by Facebook

Hacklang.org Last Thursday, Facebook revealed its latest achievement, Hack, a new programming language. When Facebook was created ten years ago, it was coded entirely in PHP. However, as Facebook became bigger, the language became harder to manage and developers were more susceptible to making mistakes. The manager of Facebook’s Hack team, Bryan O’Sullivan, helped eliminate …

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The Inventor of the Hashtag

Chris Messina, a former Google designer, first proposed the hashtag idea on Twitter back in 2007. However, he wanted to use the ‘#’ symbol as a way to create “groups”. Here’s his first tweet proposing the idea: Much to his chagrin, Twitter rejected his idea then but took it up years later as a news …

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4 Free, Online Photo Editors

GIMP GIMP is an open-source, image-editing tool that allows users to customize additional features and abilities into their software. It’s a free, downloadable application (from their website) that focuses on photo enhancement and digital retouching. This program works on various operating systems and supports numerous file formats. PicMonkey  PicMonkey is a photo-editing tool that focuses …

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Codecademy

Codecademy is an excellent resource for learning new programming languages and coding techniques. They provide lessons and exercises for everything from basic HTML and CSS to JavaScript, PHP, jQuery, Ruby, Python and so much more. They even have projects for you to accomplish by utilizing programming languages to create and style various web features. They …

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