Is there such a thing as “white hat” research ethics violations?

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about some of the ethical dilemmas involved in using public data for research, using an example of facial recognition researchers who used YouTube videos of people undergoing hormone replacement therapy to improve their algorithms’ ability to recognize faces from pre- and post-transition. Since reading that article, I’ve seen the occasional …

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Presentations!

Sometimes we get too close to our research. Ok, all of the time we’re probably too close. If you’re like me, you’re fascinated by what you do, and even when things are slow-going, you’re still excited to wake up and think about things. The problem is, you might spend all day, every day, thinking about …

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Our Reseach in Simple Words

I accept Rich Lenski’s challenge to explain our research in the 1,000 most used words of the English language using the Up-Goer Five Text Editor (http://splasho.com/upgoer5/).  Here is the result! “We study how tiny living things move through water or stick together and grow in a group. We also study how these tiny living things talk …

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Embodied Thinking: New article

Rethinking Technology & Creativity in the 21st Century is a series of articles we have been writing for Tech Trends. The latest article in the series has just ben published. This article focuses on Embodied Thinking as a key trans-disciplinary habit of mind often used by creative people across disciplines. Our previous articles have looked at Perceiving, Patterning, and Abstracting. …

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Quantum GDP

  “It’s been only half jokingly said that today a third of GDP is attributable to quantum mechanics,” — former Lockheed CEO Norm Augustine. I’ve heard the one third or 30% of GDP figure from time to time, but have never seen a detailed analysis. A list of modern technologies that arose from quantum mechanics …

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Vijay Iyer, polymath & a fantastic example of trans-disciplinary creativity

Vijay Iyer,  (http://vijay-iyer.com/) is an Indian-American jazz pianist and composer. He is a MacArthur Genius grant winner and is currently Franklin and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts at Harvard University and is widely regarded as being one of the most innovative composers and musicians today. His music transcends national boundaries through creatively bringing together traditional …

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Announcement – £500,000 EU Food Fraud Grant for Queen’s University Belfast and MSU’s Food Fraud Initiative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Dr. John Spink, Director & Assistant Professor, Food Fraud Initiative, Michigan State University, spinkj@msu.edu , www.FoodFraud.msu.edu , Phone: (517) 381-4491 MSU’s Food Fraud Initiative Director Dr. John Spink is pleased to announce being included as a Co-Investigator on a research team that was awarded a £500,000 grant to tackle global Food …

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[Summer] Is Coming

I get nostalgic as summer arrives each year; I remember neglecting my homework to go play outside, so excited for the lawn sprinkler. And when school was finally over, well, life just couldn’t get better. In my rose-colored memory, my summers looked a lot like The Sandlot and Troop Beverly Hills (I neither played baseball …

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Speed limits and theoretical frameworks

Two of my colleagues, Josh Rosenberg and Punya Mishra, have recently blogged about the value of theories and frameworks, both using the technology integration framework TPACK as an example. I highly recommend both of their posts, and I’d like to spend a little time building on the conversation that they’ve started. In the 2006 Mishra & Koehler article that I (and 2000+ …

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Bad Science

“Studies suggest that literally everything causes cancer” “Are bagels killing your kids?” “Brain scans reveal that tiny demons are to blame for ADHD” Everyone wants to write a good headline. A catchy headline drives clicks, ad views, and thus revenue and recognition for the writer. And nothing catches the eye like a well placed scare …

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The Soul of the Research University

Basic research, whose applications may be decades in the future, is an uncertain investment for any single entity (e.g., corporation), even if it is an essential public good for the long term advancement of civilization. Consequently, basic research is mostly done at universities and government labs. Indeed, the vast majority of research in the US is led …

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Is science self-correcting?

More fun from our man Ioannidis. See earlier posts Medical science? , NIH discovers reproducibility and Bounded cognition. A toy model of the dynamics of scientific research, with probability distributions for accuracy of experimental results, mechanisms for updating of beliefs by individual scientists, crowd behavior, bounded cognition, etc. can easily exhibit parameter regions where progress is limited …

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Seeing mathematics everywhere…

Dame Kathleen Ollernshaw was deaf since the age of 8. Despite this she had an amazing life as a mathematician, amateur astronomer, politician (she served as mayor of Manchester as well as in the Thatcher administration) and mother. To learn more about her read this story on the Scientific American website, titled Centenarian Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw—Conqueror of Magic …

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