What Was I Thinking?

The LTEE has run for over 10,000 days and almost 67,000 generations. It’s time to shut it down, as of today. It’s been a hell of a lot of work, and we have almost nothing to show for it. As some astute commentators have noted around the web, the creatures in the flasks are still …

More

Pro Bono Analytics Is Growing Social

Pro Bono Analytics is a program by INFORMS (the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, for the acronym-averse), “the largest society in the world for professionals in the field of operations research (O.R.), management science, and analytics”. PBA “connects our members and other analytics professionals with nonprofit organizations working in underserved and developing communities”. …

More

Trump Triumph Viewed From China

This is from a blog that tracks Chinese public opinion, mainly via the internet. I don’t agree with everything in the original post, but here’s something sourced from the crowd: … a widely-read Weibo post (again originated from Zhihu) summarizes what Trump’s win has “taught China”, generating tens of thousands of retweets. “1. We should …

More

How folks were talking about the United States Presidential election forecast (with sentiment analysis)

How folks were talking about the United States Presidential election forecast (with sentiment analysis) – Joshua M. Rosenberg Out of an interest in how folks thought and were talking about the United States Presidential election forecast, I used TAGS to track tweets including both the words “forecast” and “election”, “model” and “election”, “predict” and “election”, …

More

Joe Rogan interviews Dan Bilzerian

This is one of the best interviews I’ve heard in a long time. Warning: NSFW. Joe Rogan interviews professional poker player and social media icon Dan Bilzerian. If you don’t know who he is, check him out on Instagram (guns, girls, private jets, high stakes poker = 20 million followers = NSFW). Among the topics covered: …

More

#proudMIeducator: Why a Hashtag Isn’t Enough to Save the Teaching Profession

The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) recently launched a media campaign designed to recognize the work of educators across the state. Referred to as Proud Michigan Educator, this campaign was developed to combat the negative rhetoric surrounding the teaching profession which often blames teachers for the failings of public education and contributes to low teacher …

More

Week 1 Reflection: Online Presence and Public Scholarship Working Group

In committing co-facilitating the Online Presence and Public Scholarship Working Group, I’ve also committed to meta & in-process reflection on the process so we can gather data and evidence to provide to the MSU Academic Advancement Network nodes as they’re engaged in finding ways to develop communities of practice that integrate across related disciplinary clusters …

More

Bringing Your CV to Life

Traditionally, a curriculum vitae (CV) is an articulation of one’s qualifications and accomplishments in an academic context. The Latin root of the term suggests the extent to which the CV indicates a “course of life.” Despite the dynamic and organic connotations of this Latin root, most CVs are printed documents updated periodically by faculty members …

More

Twitter as a Platform of Collaboration

Whenever I talk to faculty and students about the use of social media in the academy, I advocate for a community building approach. The idea is relatively simple: communication has the power to enrich or impoverish our relationships with one another; we should resist impoverishing and cultivate enriching practices of social media communications. However simple the …

More

Bot Angels in the Food World

There’s something serious to be said about robots and their persistent intrusion into the food world. But saying it requires a bit of set up, so don’t expect anything too serious in this week’s blog. We got off on robots years ago when any blogger was going to be beset by dozens of computer programs—bots, …

More

New article in Tech Trends: Design guidelines for graduate program social media use

In 2014, Colin Terry, John Bell, Virginia Hiltz, Tracy Russo, and other members of a group interested in social media within our Educational Psychology and Educational Technology program presented a paper on best practices for graduate program social media use at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference. We’re excited the article is …

More

Data and Racists

In July 2015, PEGIDA posted a link to a GoogleMap. The map was littered with the red balloons GoogleMaps uses to denote location. Each balloon denoted the site of a home for refugees or asylum seekers. Lutz Bachmann had already encouraged his followers to camp out in front of a home for asylum seekers in …

More

Enter Title Here

I might as well start out today by just admitting up front that it’s not really proving to be particularly conducive to blogging. I mean, what is this blogging thing, anyway? (Sounds like the start of a Seinfeld monologue, doesn’t it?). There was a particular idea to it back in the stone age years of …

More

Blogging Bioarchaeology: Open Access Publication Now Available!

I’m happy to announce that my journal article with Kristina Killgrove (poweredbyosteons.org) on blogging bioarchaeology has finally published! It is featured in a special Internet Archaeology issue that was created by Colleen Morgan and Judith Winters. You can read the full open access article online here: Bones, Bodies, and Blogs: Outreach and Engagement in Bioarchaeology Meyers …

More

What do teachers and researchers discuss on Twitter at science education conferences?

Comparing discussions on Twitter from two science education conferences My friend recommended an article by Sherin (2013), which got me interested in a simple natural language processing (NLP) technique. I had used TAGs to archive Tweets from the NARST conference and became interested in comparing the tweets from that conference, which consists primarily of presentations …

More

Favorite Examples of Evolution

When the cold bites, When the review stings, When the news is sad, I simply remember these evolving things, And then I don’t feel so bad! — with apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein Over on Twitter, the biology students from George Jenkins High School in Lakeland, Florida, asked me and many others: “What’s your favorite example of evolution?” …

More

Food Fix Podcast

I’m involved in a new podcast called Food Fix that’s launching today. It features interviews with researchers who are figuring out how to better feed the world. It’s funded by Michigan State University’s Global Center for Food Systems Innovations. Give it a try! It should be in iTunes soon. Tweet

Infectiously Fun Science

Science is sometimes frustrating. The work is often repetitive and even tedious. It can be hard to explain to our friends and families—and sometimes even to peers—what we’re doing and why we think it’s important and interesting. The current state of the academic job market is terrible. But science is also often fun. There’s the joy …

More

The most-viewed YouTube videos

Earlier this week, Google announced that Psy’s insanely viral YouTube music video, Gangnam Style, officially broke the 2,147,483,647 view barrier. What’s significant about that number, you ask? That’s the largest number that can be encoded by a 32-bit integer number. The folks at Google never suspected a video would exceed 2 billion views until Gangnam …

More

The reddit world map

We can all agree that online social networks dominate most people’s day-to-day Internet lives. 90% of all U.S. adults aged 18-29 have a Facebook account, and a large portion of those people check their Facebook at least once a day. What’s strange is that most people regard social networks as nothing more than a blob …

More