Multiallelic copy number variation

Written by: Stephen Hsu

Primary Source: Information Processing

These new results probe surprisingly large variation in copy number (duplicated genomic segments) and its impact on gene expression. Earlier posts involving CNVs.

Large multiallelic copy number variations in humans
Nature Genetics (2015) doi:10.1038/ng.3200

Thousands of genomic segments appear to be present in widely varying copy numbers in different human genomes. We developed ways to use increasingly abundant whole-genome sequence data to identify the copy numbers, alleles and haplotypes present at most large multiallelic CNVs (mCNVs). We analyzed 849 genomes sequenced by the 1000 Genomes Project to identify most large (>5-kb) mCNVs, including 3878 duplications, of which 1356 appear to have 3 or more segregating alleles. We find that mCNVs give rise to most human variation in gene dosage—seven times the combined contribution of deletions and biallelic duplications— and that this variation in gene dosage generates abundant variation in gene expression. We describe ‘runaway duplication haplotypes’ in which genes, including HPR and ORM1, have mutated to high copy number on specific haplotypes. We also describe partially successful initial strategies for analyzing mCNVs via imputation and provide an initial data resource to support such analyses.

 

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Stephen Hsu
Stephen Hsu is vice president for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University. He also serves as scientific adviser to BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute) and as a member of its Cognitive Genomics Lab. Hsu’s primary work has been in applications of quantum field theory, particularly to problems in quantum chromodynamics, dark energy, black holes, entropy bounds, and particle physics beyond the standard model. He has also made contributions to genomics and bioinformatics, the theory of modern finance, and in encryption and information security. Founder of two Silicon Valley companies—SafeWeb, a pioneer in SSL VPN (Secure Sockets Layer Virtual Private Networks) appliances, which was acquired by Symantec in 2003, and Robot Genius Inc., which developed anti-malware technologies—Hsu has given invited research seminars and colloquia at leading research universities and laboratories around the world.
Stephen Hsu

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