Nifty papers I wrote that nobody knows about: (Part 3: Non-equilibrium Quantum Statistical Mechanics)

This is the third part of the “Nifty Papers” series. Link to Part 1. Link to Part 2. In 1999, I was in the middle of writing about quantum information theory with my colleague Nicolas Cerf. We had discovered that quantum conditional entropy can be negative, discussed this finding with respect to the problem of quantum measurement, separability, Bell inequalities, as well …

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Learning R

I have recently dedicated myself to learning R, a programming language and environment for focusing largely on statistical analysis and computing. The benefit of using R over other statistical computing packages is that it is free, open-source, and has a hugely active community around its use.  R can be used cross-platform  (PCs, Macs, and Linux) …

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When All Else Fails

In one of the worst academic job markets in history, many of us have been compelled to rethink our plans for the next year. Instead of starting that shiny new job, we are facing yet another year of being a grad student. If you’re in this position, know that you are not alone. There are …

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A Documentary on Michel Foucault

Open Culture recently dug up a 1993 documentary on Foucault, titled Michel Foucault: Beyond Good and Evil. As described by Josh Jones, the documentary “explores the philosopher and his complex and controversial life through interviews with colleagues and biographers and re-enactments of Foucault’s storied exploits in the American counterculture.” Given how often Foucault appears on syllabi in …

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[Summer] Is Coming

I get nostalgic as summer arrives each year; I remember neglecting my homework to go play outside, so excited for the lawn sprinkler. And when school was finally over, well, life just couldn’t get better. In my rose-colored memory, my summers looked a lot like The Sandlot and Troop Beverly Hills (I neither played baseball …

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Speed limits and theoretical frameworks

Two of my colleagues, Josh Rosenberg and Punya Mishra, have recently blogged about the value of theories and frameworks, both using the technology integration framework TPACK as an example. I highly recommend both of their posts, and I’d like to spend a little time building on the conversation that they’ve started. In the 2006 Mishra & Koehler article that I (and 2000+ …

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Parenting in Grad School

Parenting in grad school can be crazy hard. There is really so much to say about parenting in grad school. I asked the question on Twitter and on Facebook and was just overwhelmed with the responses. I have blogged on Gradhacker before about being a mother in academia. As I enter what is hopefully the …

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Writing Boot Camps

Writing can be such an isolating task, whose very isolation may deter us from starting or progressing toward our goals. The other obstacle we often face is a lack of accountability once we leave the classroom for the desert of dissertation writing. Writing boot camps address both challenges by providing a space and time in …

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A Celebratory Weekend

This past weekend marked MSU’s commencement ceremonies, with over 9,000 students across the university receiving degrees (including those graduating both this spring and summer).  There are a number of different ceremonies, and the College of Education was well represented across many of them. The weekend started on Friday morning when we held the college’s Doctoral …

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Stay on target!

I’ll gladly go on record as identifying the Battle of Yavin, or what the uninitiated might refer to as the climax of the original Star Wars movie, as my vote for the most iconic science fiction battle of all time. I have a lot of reasons to love this particular scene, and you’d be surprised …

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10 Steps to Interview with Confidence

Excited, confident, optimistic, stressed out, anxious, terrified… How you feel going into your job interview greatly depends on your preparation. Put yourself in the best position possible with the following tips culled from my experience with both Skype and in-person interviews, as well as advice I gathered during my own preparation. For more on phone/Skype …

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So… how’d your interview go?

March 5th-7th, 2014, I had the pleasure to participate in the CIRTL (Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning) Network Exchange program as a former Future Academic Scholars in Teaching (FAST) Fellow at Michigan State University. I traveled down to The University of Georgia (UGA) to give presentations on both my Teaching-As-Research (TAR) …

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Mid-Semester Evaluations

This week marked (what I hope will be) a turn toward spring in West Michigan. I can leave my parka at home, I can see some grass peeking up timidly from the mountains of snow/salt/mud, and I can hear birds nesting outside my window. This is really great: I was feeling stuck in a snow-covered …

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Our Third Anniversary

“Let’s not sugar coat this, grad school is tough” In June 2011, that was the first sentence to the first blog post introducing GradHacker to the world. Three years later, I still think it’s a good introduction. Graduate students live tough lives. They aren’t quite undergraduates and aren’t quite faculty. They are expected to ace …

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Lessons from the Maker Movement

Making things is fun. The Maker movement, as it’s commonly known, is centered on the idea that when it comes to technology especially, it’s better and more fun to do-it-yourself than rely on off-the-shelf products. Here on GradHacker, we’ve discussed different ways we’ve gone about doing this to varying degrees. It’s true that GradHackers as …

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Going Alt-Ac: How to Begin

Maybe you have become disenchanted with academia and/or the academic job search, or you have recently discovered the numerous possibilities outside of the university. Perhaps you have known from the beginning that a different path calls to you, or maybe you’re just curious. Whatever the case may be, read on for tips and suggestions for …

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