Broad Data Praxis

short talk delivered during ALA Midwinter 2016, LITA Top Tech Trends Panel Today, I’d like to discuss a trend I call broad data praxis. Data praxis itself is the combination of the theory and the practice of working with data. Typically, data praxis is naturalized within a particular discipline. There is a long tradition of data …

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DH 2015: Coalescing Frames

The main program of DH 2015 has come to a close. My thanks to the organizers for an intellectually challenging conference. My thanks especially to the brave individuals that forcefully problematized DH as community – who is in, who is out? | who is named, who is not named? | global, really? | inclusivity on whose …

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Finding the Digital Humanities

While popular retelling likes to place the origins of the “digital humanities” with John Unsworth and the entitling of the volume, A Companion to Digital Humanities, the term has earlier origins and DH first began appearing in 1998.  The term is often associated appropriately with one of the pioneers in digital projects, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). In November of …

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Digital Collections, Data Visualization, and Accessibility: What to Do? (repost)

[This is another crosspost from the Digital Scholarship Collaborative Sandbox blog from the MSU Libraries. The original blog post can be read there.] In my earlier post “Digital Collections and Accessibility”, I touched upon the considerations we would need to address when building or creating digital collections (or other things that rely heavily on utilizing …

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Digital Media’s Demands and Yields

In lieu of telling you where this budding Media Preservation program and I are at in our fourth month together, I’m going to share a few basic concepts of the field, before steering slightly toward digital scholarship and a few tools/resources that might excite you. In other words, I’ll keep it light, and will share …

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Oral History and Digital Humanities

All fields in the humanities have been transformed by digital technology, but none more so than oral history.  The new book, Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement, published by Palgrave Macmillan, explores the impact that new technologies have had on the field.  Edited by Doug Boyd and Mary Larson, the essays in the …

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AHA 2015: Data for Historical Research

At Kalani Craig’s invitation I had the great pleasure of joining a rockstar cast of instructors for the AHA Getting Started in Digital History workshop series. During my workshop, “Data for Historical Research” (slides below), I cast a pretty wide net. The general purpose was to: recast common historical objects of inquiry (audio, text, video, …

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Library Collections as Humanities Data

Devin Higgins and I, recently published a paper [PDF] that argues for thinking about library collections as Humanities data. It instantiates some of the conversations we’ve been having at MSU Libraries around thinking about how we, and the general library community, might better promote and enable use of library collections for Digital Humanists. I’ve said …

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Metadata = MetaGold?

If there is one thing that most libraries, archives, and museums have in bulk, it’s collections metadata. It’s the data that describes content in the collections. This stuff is added, updated, and augmented nearly everyday. Overtime and at sufficient scale it can give insight into the contours of a particular field – author gender distribution, co-citation …

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