Books Without the Burden

Books are expensive; textbooks are outrageously expensive. And heavy. So even if you’re a die-hard print lover, this list of free books available online can ease your burden (both financially and physically). The first and most obvious is the heavy hitter: Project Gutenberg. Project Gutenberg runs off of donations and impressively manages to provide over 42,000 …

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The Internet: Chopped & Screwed

A few years ago the Internet was introduced as a dial-up service, and it was an irrelevant tool that very few people had access to. Today, the Internet has become a requirement for communication and is accessible on any device in many places around the world. Corporate self-indulgence and the government has allowed the Internet …

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Tech Skills Ruled 2013

As the presence of companies grows online, they are constantly looking for web developers with the skills to get the job done. Although preference in development software varies, there was a significant spike in searches for a particular set of skills. According to Stack Overflow’s statistics, a culmination of frequently searched keywords by companies to …

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Digital Humanities at MSU

This past year I had the fun assignment of co-chairing a committee on the digital humanities for the CIC (as most of you know, the CIC or Committee on Institutional Cooperation is a consortium of BigTen universities plus the University of Chicago). The charge of the committee was to find out what the CIC and its member institutions could do …

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Queering Digital Humanities

Recently on the Humanist Discussion Group, Willard McCarty posed a bit of a challenge. He explained “Recently I found myself in a hotel lift with a colleague who had attended the same conference but with whom I had not previously spoken. I asked him what he was working on, or interested in, or some such …

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Zombie Apocalypse and the Digital Humanities

I was reading Gary Olson’s post in The Chronicle, “How Not to Reform Humanities Scholarship,”  (http://chronicle.com/article/How-Not-to-Reform-Humanities/130675/) and it reminded me of the wonderful opening scene in Romero’s Night of the Living Dead (1968).  Barbra’s brother is teasing her with, “They’re coming to get you, Barbra, they’re coming to get you.”  In Olson’s palaver, and ones like it (I …

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